Daily Compliance Item- 10/24/14- Current Event

SU basketball, football focus of NCAA ESPN.com
Syracuse University’s men’s basketball and football programs are under NCAA investigation for allegations, including providing extra benefits and academic issues, that date back at least 10 years, a source said Thursday.
Syracuse will go before the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions in Indianapolis on Oct. 30-31, sources said.
The majority of the allegations — and the most serious — involve the men’s basketball program. Among the allegations facing the men’s basketball team are receiving extra benefits and academic issues, a source said. Those allegations go back about 10 years and are as current as the 2013 season, a source said.
“There were things going on consistently (with the men’s basketball program) for a long time,” a source said.
Jim Boeheim has been Syracuse’s head basketball coach since 1976.
The football team is also facing allegations involving extra benefits, but only for a two-or-three-year stretch around 2004 or 2005, a source said. From 1991-2004, Paul Pasqualoni was Syracuse’s football coach, followed by Greg Robinson from 2005-08. Pasqualoni is now a defensive line coach with the Chicago Bears, while Robinson is defensive coordinator at San Jose State.
None of the football allegations occurred since Doug Marrone took over in 2009, a source said. Marrone left for the Buffalo Bills in 2013 and was replaced by Scott Shafer.
Syracuse.com reported part of the basketball investigation focuses on the academic record of Fab Melo, who was suspended in 2012. Also, former teammate James Southerland was suspended briefly for academics in the 2013 season but eventually returned to the team.
Syracuse.com also reported Southerland’s suspension was the result of an NCAA investigation into the basketball program’s academic records.
Since the NCAA’s inquiry began, Syracuse restructured the athletic department’s academic services department, which is responsible for keeping athletes academically eligible. The restructuring included at least three employees changing jobs, Syracuse.com reported.
CBSSports.com first reported in March the NCAA’s investigation into the men’s basketball program.
When investigations require hearings before the Committee on Infractions, it involves the more serious Level I violations and/or Level II violations. NCAA officials will not comment on pending cases.
This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Daily Compliance Item- 4/26/13- Current Event

DI Legislative Council sets date and time for initial men’s basketball practice

NCAA.org

The Division I Legislative Council adopted legislation that puts the start date for men’s basketball practice at 42 days before a school’s first regular-season game. The measure also limits teams to 30 days of practice in that 42-day period.

 

The Council adopted a separate proposal that eliminated the requirement that the first men’s basketball practice begin no earlier than 5 p.m. on the first allowable day, preferring to allow schools to exercise their own best judgment when considering appropriate start times for basketball practice. Both proposals will go into effect for the 2013 season.

 

The proposals had been tabled since April 2012, when the Legislative Council tabled the bulk of the proposals in that year’s cycle to allow the Rules Working Group to fulfill its charge of making the Division I rulebook more meaningful, enforceable and supportive of student-athlete success.

 

The Rules Working Group and thought leaders from the membership and the National Association of Men’s Basketball Coaches recommended adoption of the proposal. It creates a flexible preseason practice schedule that allows practice days and off days instead of the current schedule that leads to practice occurring every possible day. The more flexible approach provides coaches with the ability to determine how to use practice opportunities.

 

The original proposal allowed practice to start 40 days before the first game, but the Council members adjusted the rule to accommodate for celebratory events often planned around the first men’s basketball practice. Because a significant number of teams start playing games on the first day the rules allow it (the second Friday in November), the first day for practice would fall on a Sunday, which is not conducive to celebratory events on campus. Expanding the time period to 42 days allows the first practice to be held on a Friday. The Women’s Basketball Coaches Association expressed preference to maintain its current 40-day period as an expansion posed potential conflicts with a weekend when recruiting can occur.

 

In other business, the Council recommended the Board suspend Prop. No. RWG 13-3, which eliminated the rule banning certain modes of communication (including text messaging) and eliminated numerical limits on phone calls. More than 75 schools requested an override of the rule, requiring the Board to reconsider its earlier action. The Council believes the proposal should be suspended and considered as a group with three other recruiting-related proposals that were either suspended by the Board or referred for further discussion before adoption.

The other proposals would:

  • Set a uniform, earlier start date for recruiting communication and contact (Proposal No.RWG 13-2)
  • Lift restrictions on printed recruiting materials ( Proposal No.RWG 13-5-A)
  • Deregulate who can perform recruiting tasks. (Proposal No.RWG 11-2)

The Board will consider the recommendation at its May 2 meeting in Indianapolis. Proposals adopted by the Council are considered final at the close of the Board meeting.

Daily Compliance Item- 1/28/13- 13.02.8- Men’s Basketball Recruiting Model

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University are planning their spring recruiting trips to make sure they stay within the 130-person day limit.  There are several events taking place during the April Evaluation Period that they would like to attend.

Do evaluations during the April evaluation periods count toward the 130-person day limit?

 

Yes.  NCAA Educational Column- 1/23/13-NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Recruiting Model (I)– states that the following questions and answers are intended to assist the membership in applying NCAA Division I legislation as it relates to the men’s basketball recruiting model.

Question No. 1: Do evaluation activities during the April evaluation periods count toward the 130 recruiting-person days restriction and the limit of seven recruiting opportunities per prospective student-athlete?

Answer: Yes. Evaluations during April must be included in the 130 recruiting-person days and count toward the limit of seven recruiting opportunities per prospective student-athlete. Note that if an event is conducted on consecutive days in a tournament format, an institution would only be charged with a single recruiting opportunity per prospective student-athlete.

 

Question No. 2: During recruiting periods, is it permissible for an institution’s coach to sit with a prospective student-athlete’s parents during the prospective student-athlete’s contest or to have in-person contact with the prospective student-athlete after the contest once he has been released?

Answer: No. It is not permissible to have in-person contact with a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s relatives or legal guardians during the day of the prospective student-athlete’s competition, including time before and after the competition.

 

Question No. 3: Is it permissible for an institution to make a telephone call to a prospective student-athlete who has reported on call for competition or competition-related activities?

Answer: No. It is not permissible to make a telephone call to a prospective student-athlete who has reported on call for competition or competition-related activities until he has been released by the appropriate institutional authority in accordance with the parameters of NCAA Bylaw 13.1.6.2.

 

Question No. 4: Is it permissible for an institution to send an email or other form of electronic correspondence (e.g., text message) to a prospective student-athlete who has reported on call for competition or competition-related activities?

Answer: It is not permissible to send electronic correspondence to a prospective student-athlete while he is on call for competition at the competition site (e.g., arena, stadium). However, it is permissible to send general correspondence (including electronic correspondence) to a prospective student-athlete while he is on call and not at the competition site, or while he is at any location, once released by the appropriate authority.

 

Question No. 5: Is it permissible for an institution to make a telephone call, send an email, or send another form of electronic correspondence (e.g., text message) to a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians while the prospective student-athlete is on call for competition or competition-related activities? What if the prospective student-athlete is participating in a certified event?

Answer: It is permissible to make a telephone call, send an email, or send another form of electronic correspondence (e.g., text message) to a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians while the prospective student-athlete is on call for competition or competition-related activities. Such communication may also occur with a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians while the prospective student-athlete is participating in a certified event. However, all communication with a prospective student-athlete’s coach or any individual associated with the prospective student-athlete as a result of the prospective student-athlete’s participation in basketball, directly or indirectly, is prohibited during the time period in which the prospective student-athlete is participating in a certified event.

 

Question No. 6: During the April evaluation periods, is it permissible for coaches to attend events other than certified events (e.g., noninstitutional organized events that are approved, sponsored or conducted by an applicable state, national or international governing body and are not organized and conducted primarily for a recruiting purpose)? Is it permissible for a coach to visit a high school to talk to a high school coach or pick up a transcript?

Answer: No. Evaluations of live athletics activities during the April evaluation periods are specifically limited to events that are certified pursuant to Bylaw 13.18. No other off-campus evaluation activities may occur during the April evaluation periods.

 

Question No. 7: During the academic year recruiting period, is it permissible for coaches to evaluate at an “open gym”?

Answer: It would be permissible for coaches to evaluate if the “open gym” (or pick-up game or similar activity) has been approved by the appropriate authority at the scholastic institution as a regular scholastic activity; it involves only students enrolled at the institution where the activity is occurring; and it is not organized for the purpose of permitting institutional coaches to observe the prospective student-athletes participating in the activity.

 

Question No. 8: During the July dead periods, may an institution conduct institutional camps and clinics?

Answer: As specified in Bylaw 13.12.1.5, institutions may not conduct institutional camps and clinics (those that include prospective student-athletes) during dead periods.

 

Question No. 9: If a prospective student-athlete making an official visit is a member of a nontraditional family (e.g., divorce, separation), is it permissible to provide travel expenses to more than two individuals?

Answer: No. It is only permissible to provide travel expenses in conjunction with an official visit to two individuals who are the prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians.

 

Question No. 10: May an institution pay the costs for a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians to receive meals and lodging while in transit to an official visit without starting the 48-hour official visit period?

Answer: Yes.

 

Question No. 11: May a coaching staff member have in-person contact with a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s relatives or legal guardians during a day of the prospective student-athlete’s competition, provided the prospective student-athlete has signed a National Letter of Intent or has submitted a financial deposit in response to the institution’s offer of admission?

Answer: If a prospective student-athlete has signed a National Letter of Intent or the institution’s written offer of admission and/or financial aid or the institution has received the prospective student-athlete’s financial deposit in response to the institution’s offer of admission, in-person contact with the prospective student-athlete and/or his relatives or legal guardians is permissible in the following situations:

(a) During a recruiting period, in-person contact is permissible, subject to the provisions of Bylaw 13.1.6.2.

(b) For competition that occurs during an evaluation period, in-person contact is permissible after the prospective student-athlete’s final contest of an event is completed and the prospective student-athlete is released by the appropriate authority and he leaves the dressing and meeting facility.

Therefore, a coaching staff member may sit with a prospective-student-athlete’s relatives or legal guardians during such a prospective student-athlete’s competition that occurs during a recruiting period, but may not sit with the relatives or legal guardians during an evaluation period.

 

Question No. 12: Does the exception that applies during the July evaluation period (a replaced coach is not required to return to the institution’s campus before engaging in additional recruiting activities, provided not more than three coaches engage in off-campus recruiting activities each day) also apply to the April evaluation periods?

Answer: No.

 

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 11.7.4.3.1 (exception — basketball — July evaluation periods), 13.02.5.3 (recruiting period — men’s basketball), 13.1.5.3 (contacts — men’s basketball), 13.1.6.2 (contact restrictions — competition site), 13.1.6.2.1 (additional restriction — men’s and women’s basketball), 13.1.6.2.1.1 (exceptions — men’s basketball), 13.1.7.8 (basketball evaluations), 13.4.1 (recruiting materials), 13.4.1.2.1 (electronic transmission — exception — men’s basketball), 13.5.2.6.1 (exception — transportation expenses for a prospective student-athletes parents or legal guardians — men’s basketball), 13.6.7.1.1 (meals and lodging while in transit) and 13.17.2 (recruiting calendar — men’s basketball)]

Daily Compliance Item- 1/24/13- 17.1.6.2.1.1.4- Summer Activities- Men’s Basketball

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University will soon begin working on summer workout schedules.  With regard to the 8 weeks of required activities, can the coaches create individual student-athlete schedules or do all student-athletes have to be on the same schedule?

You can create individual schedules.  NCAA Educational Column- 1/23/13-NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Summer Athletics Activities (I)– states that the following questions and answers are intended to assist the membership in applying NCAA Division I legislation as it relates to summer athletics activities in men’s basketball.

Question No. 1: Is there a limit on the number of student-athletes who may participate in skill-related instruction as part of the required summer athletics activities?

Answer: No.

Question No. 2: May an institution declare a new definition of its “week,” or is it required to use the week it used during the academic year?

Answer: The institution may declare a new definition of its “week” for the summer.

Question No. 3: May the eight weeks of required summer athletics activities be determined on an individual basis?

Answer: Yes.

Question No. 4: Is it permissible to conduct required summer athletics activities during the week before finals and the final exam period of the summer term(s)?

Answer: Yes.

Question No. 5: May coaches be present during and/or conduct weight training and conditioning activities that are part of the eight hours per week of required summer athletics activities?

Answer: Yes.

Question No. 6: If an institution has multiple summer sessions, do the eight weeks of required summer athletics activities have to be continuous?

Answer: No. The eight weeks do not have to be consecutive or continuous. However, unless a student-athlete meets the exception to the summer-school requirement, workouts are only permissible during the time period (term or terms) in which the student-athlete is enrolled, which includes only the time from the opening day of classes through the last day of final exams for each applicable term.

Question No. 7: Are there exceptions for the service academies for situations when their student-athletes are assigned to summer work at a location (e.g., military base) that is separate from the service academy? May the coaching staff conduct workouts with those student-athletes assigned to another area of the country?

Answer: If a student-athlete is enrolled in a summer-school session, or meeting an exception to the enrollment requirement, it is permissible for the coaching staff to conduct workouts at the assigned location.

Question No. 8: When may an institution begin to conduct summer athletics activities with its men’s basketball student-athletes? When must summer athletics activities end?

Answer: Summer athletics activities may begin the day following the institution’s spring commencement exercises. Summer athletics activities must end by the day before the first day of classes for the fall term. Note that unless a student-athlete meets the exception to the summer-school requirement, workouts are only permissible during the time period (term or terms) in which the student-athlete is enrolled, which includes only the time from the opening day of classes through the last day of final exams for each applicable term.

Question No. 9: Must incoming student-athletes (freshmen and transfers) sign the drug-testing consent form before participating in required summer athletics activities?

Answer: No. Summer drug testing is part of the previous academic year testing.

Question No. 10: Must an incoming student-athlete be certified as eligible to practice in order to participate in required summer athletics activities?

Answer: No.

Question No. 11: Are institutions required to provide student-athletes any days off during the eight weeks in which they are participating in required summer athletics activities?

Answer: No. There is no requirement to provide a day (or days) off during the eight weeks of required activities. However, student-athletes are limited to a maximum of eight hours per week, with not more than two hours per week spent on skill-related instruction.

Question No. 12: May an institution conduct required summer athletics activities on a vacation day during the summer?

Answer: Yes. However, the activities must count toward the eight hours per week limitation and any skill instruction must also count toward the week’s permissible two hours of skill instruction.

Question No. 13: May student-athletes participate in unlimited hours of countable activities with their coaches during an institutional vacation period (e.g., Memorial Day, Independence Day) while engaging in required summer athletics activities?

Answer: No, a student-athlete engaging in required summer athletics activities is limited to a maximum of eight hours per week with not more than two hours per week spent on skill-related instruction

Question No. 14: May an institution publicize its skill-related instruction sessions or conduct them in view of a general public audience?

Answer: No. The general prohibition on publicizing and conducting skill-related instruction in view of a general public audience applies to the skill-related instruction that is conducted as part of summer athletics activities.

Question No. 15: May an institution conduct a skill-related instruction session during an institutional camp or clinic with the campers as an audience?

Answer: No. The campers would constitute a general public audience.

Question No. 16: May a student-athlete who has been certified as a nonqualifier participate in required summer athletics activities during the summer prior to initial full-time enrollment at the certifying institution?

Answer: Yes, provided he is enrolled in summer school and the activities are conducted during the time period (term or terms) in which the student-athlete is enrolled, which includes only the time from the opening day of classes through the last day of final exams for each applicable term.

Question No. 17: If a student-athlete was certified as a nonqualifier during the academic year, when may he begin to engage in required summer athletics activities after the year in residence?

Answer: Such a student-athlete may begin to participate in required summer athletics activities the day following the institution’s spring commencement exercises, provided the student-athlete is enrolled in summer school or meets the exception to summer school enrollment.

Question No. 18: Does a student-athlete’s temporary certification period begin when he starts participating in required summer athletics activities?

Answer: No.

Question No. 19: May a student-athlete who is enrolled in consecutive summer school sessions during the same summer (e.g., the first and second summer school sessions) engage in required summer athletics activities during the time in between sessions?

Answer: Only student-athletes who met the exception to summer-school enrollment at the end of the preceding regular academic term (e.g., spring semester, spring quarter) may engage in required summer athletics activities between terms.

Question No. 20: How does the required summer athletics activities legislation apply to an institution that offers only one summer session, and the session lasts less than eight weeks?

Answer: Prospective student-athletes (freshmen or transfers) are only permitted to participate in required athletics activities during the time period (term) in which the student-athlete is enrolled, which includes only the time from the opening day of classes through the last day of final exams for the term. Continuing student-athletes would be subject to the same application as prospective student-athletes unless they meet the appropriate provisions of the exception to summer-school enrollment. A continuing student who meets the exception may continue to engage in any remaining portion of the eight weeks of required summer activities until the day before the first day of classes for the fall term.

Question No. 21: May coursework from an early summer school session (e.g., first four-week session) from that same summer be considered when determining whether a student-athlete is meeting the exception to the summer-school requirement for the remaining weeks of the required summer athletics activities?

Answer: No. In order to meet the exception to summer-school enrollment, the student-athlete must have successfully completed the applicable academic requirements by the end of the preceding regular academic term (e.g., spring semester, spring quarter).

Question No. 22: May remedial, tutorial or noncredit courses be used to satisfy the requirements of the exception to summer-school enrollment?

Answer: Yes, provided such courses meet the requirements of NCAA Bylaw 14.4.3.4.4.

Question No. 23: Must a student-athlete who has just completed four semesters or six quarters have declared a degree program (and have completed 50 percent of the program) in order to meet the exception to summer-school enrollment?

Answer: No. Pursuant to Bylaw 14.4.3.1.7, a student-athlete must designate a degree program prior to participation in competition that occurs during or immediately before the third year of enrollment. Further, pursuant to Bylaw 14.4.3.1.7, during the first two years of enrollment, a student-athlete may use credits acceptable toward any of the institution’s degree programs. Therefore, a student-athlete may fulfill the 50 percent requirement based on credits acceptable toward any of the institution’s degree programs.

Question No. 24: May an institution provide room and board to returning student-athletes to participate in required summer athletics activities if the individuals are not enrolled in summer school?

Answer: No. It is not permissible to provide room and board to student-athletes who are not enrolled in summer school. Room and board may be provided, pursuant to Bylaw 15.2.8, to student-athletes who are enrolled in summer school.

Question No. 25: May an institution provide training table meals to student-athletes who are participating in required summer athletics activities?

Answer: No.

Question No. 26: Is it permissible to provide entertainment to student-athletes who are participating in required summer athletics activities?

Answer: No. Bylaw 16.7.1 does not apply to summer athletics activities.

 

[References: Bylaws 13.11.3.9 (required summer athletic activities — men’s basketball), 13.11.3.9.1 (exception — national service academies — incoming freshmen — men’s basketball), 14.02.13.1 (academic year of residence), 14.1.4.1 (content and purpose), 14.3.4 (residence requirement — nonqualifier), 14.3.5.1.1 (temporary certification, recruited student-athlete), 14.3.5.1.2 (temporary certification, nonrecruited student-athlete), 14.4.3.1.7 (designation of degree), 14.4.3.4.4 (remedial, tutorial and noncredit courses), 15.2.8 (summer financial aid), 16.5.2 (permissible housing and meals), 16.7.1 (away from home contests and vacation periods), 17.1.6.2.1.1.4 (summer athletic activities — men’s basketball), 17.1.6.2.1.1.4.1 (exception to summer school enrollment — academic requirements — men’s basketball), 17.1.6.2.1.1.4.1.1 (application to transfer student-athletes), 17.1.6.2.2 (skill instruction — sports other than baseball and football) 17.1.6.3.3 (definition of week) and 17.6.1.6.3.6 (vacation periods and between terms)]

Daily Compliance Item- 1/23/13- 13.11.2.1- On-Campus Evaluations in Men’s Basketball

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University (OSU) will be conducting on-campus evaluations with several prospects later this spring. Because of the head coach’s busy schedule, he will not be able to watch all of the evaluations. Is it permissible for OSU to videotape the evaluations so the head coach can review at a later time?

Yes. NCAA Educational Column- 1/23/13- NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball On-Campus Evaluations (I)- includes the following questions and answers that are intended to assist the membership in applying NCAA Division I legislation as it relates to on-campus evaluations in men’s basketball.

Question No. 1: May an institution publicize the on-campus evaluation of a prospective student-athlete?
Answer: No. NCAA Bylaw 13.10.5 specifies that an institution shall not publicize (or arrange for publicity of) a prospective student-athlete’s visit to the institution’s campus.

Question No. 2: May an institution conduct an on-campus evaluation with a prospective student-athlete who has graduated from high school and is enrolled in a preparatory school?
Answer: Yes, provided the institution has not previously conducted an on-campus evaluation with the prospective student-athlete (e.g., during senior year of high school); the evaluation is conducted at the end of the prospective student-athlete’s season; and, after he has exhausted preparatory school eligibility in basketball.

Question No. 3: May an institution conduct an on-campus evaluation with a prospective student-athlete during his senior year in high school and another while he is enrolled in a preparatory school during the following year?
Answer: No. An institution may conduct one on-campus evaluation with a prospective student-athlete while he is enrolled in high school or preparatory school and one after the prospective student-athlete enrolls full time in a collegiate institution.

Question No. 4: What activities are counted toward the permissible two hours of on-campus evaluation activities?
Answer: Any activities that are considered countable athletically related activities would count toward the permissible two hours.

Question No. 5: May an institution provide a prospective student-athlete access to locker and shower facilities during an on-campus evaluation?
Answer: Yes.

Question No. 6: May an institution conduct an on-campus evaluation with a two-year college transfer prospective student-athlete who has withdrawn from the two-year institution?
Answer: An on-campus evaluation may not be conducted with a two-year college transfer prospective student-athlete until he has exhausted two-year college eligibility in basketball. Once such a prospective student-athlete is considered to have exhausted his two-year college eligibility, he may participate in an on-campus evaluation.

Question No. 7: May an institution conduct an on-campus evaluation with a high school prospective student-athlete or two-year college transfer prospective student-athlete who is not a participant on his institution’s basketball team?
Answer: An on-campus evaluation may not be conducted with a high school prospective student-athlete or a two-year college transfer prospective student-athlete until he has exhausted his high school or two-year college eligibility in basketball, respectively. Once such a prospective student-athlete is considered to have exhausted his eligibility, he may participate in an on-campus evaluation.

Question No. 8: How does the exhausted eligibility standard apply to an international or home-schooled student who is not a participant on his institution’s basketball team?
Answer: For purposes of conducting an on-campus evaluation, an international or home-schooled student who is not a participant on his institution’s basketball team is deemed to have exhausted eligibility at the time of graduation from high school (or the international equivalent).

Question No. 9: May an institution conduct an on-campus evaluation with a four-year college transfer prospective student-athlete who has withdrawn from the four-year institution or who is not a participant on his institution’s basketball team?
Answer: An on-campus evaluation may not be conducted with a four-year college transfer prospective student-athlete until the conclusion of the prospective student-athlete’s basketball season. If the prospective student-athlete has withdrawn from the institution or is not a participant, then his season is considered to be concluded. Therefore, he may participate in an on-campus evaluation (permission to contact must be granted by the previous institution if the individual met the definition of a student-athlete at that institution).

Question No. 10: May an institution’s coach observe a prospective student-athlete participating in a pick-up game that includes the institution’s current student-athletes and count the observation as an on-campus evaluation?
Answer: If the evaluation occurs during the academic year (e.g., skill-related workouts), it is permissible if the student-athletes are eligible for practice. If the evaluation occurs in the summer, it is permissible if the student-athletes are eligible to participate in summer athletics activities (e.g., enrolled in summer school or meet the exception to summer school enrollment). Such participation counts toward each student-athlete’s limitation of eight hours of required athletics activities per week with not more than two hours of skill-related instruction (academic year or summer).

Question No. 11: May an institution’s coach observe a prospective student-athlete participating in a pick-up game that includes the institution’s current student-athletes and current student-athletes from another collegiate institution and count the observation as an on-campus evaluation?
Answer: No. If student-athletes from other institutions participate, the activity would not meet the requirements of the required summer athletics activities legislation.

Question No. 12: If an on-campus evaluation occurs during a period in which there is a limit of four on the number of student-athletes who may be involved with a coach in skill-related instruction at the same time, may four student-athletes and the prospective student-athlete participate in the activity?
Answer: Yes. The prospective student-athlete is not included in the limit of four student-athletes who may be involved at any one time in skill instruction.

Question No. 13: If an on-campus evaluation occurs during the summer, may student-athletes participate?
Answer: Yes, provided the student-athletes are eligible to participate in summer athletics activities (e.g., enrolled in summer school or meet the exception to summer school enrollment) and such participation counts toward the limitations of eight hours of required athletics activities per week and two hours of skill-related instruction.

Question No. 14: If an institution is conducting an on-campus evaluation with a prospective student-athlete during the prospective student-athlete’s unofficial visit, may it provide the prospective student-athlete with food and/or beverages?
Answer: The institution may provide water and/or electrolyte replacement drinks (e.g., Gatorade, PowerAde) to the prospective student-athlete; however, it is not permissible to provide food to the prospective student-athlete during an unofficial visit.

Question No. 15: May an institution record video of an on-campus evaluation for further review after the actual evaluation?
Answer: Yes.

Question No. 16: May more than one prospective-student-athlete participate in an on-campus evaluation at the same time?
Answer: Yes. There is no limit on the number of prospective student-athletes who may participate at the same time.

Question No. 17: May the two hours of an on-campus evaluation be divided and conducted on two different days of the prospective student-athlete’s visit?
Answer: No. Conducting evaluations (or portions of an evaluation) on different days would constitute different, separate on-campus evaluations.

Question No. 18: What constitutes the “conclusion of a prospective student-athlete’s season” for purposes of conducting an on-campus evaluation?
Answer: The “conclusion of a prospective student-athlete’s season” refers to the conclusion of the prospective student-athlete’s scholastic season. A prospective student-athlete’s season is considered concluded when his scholastic season ends, even if he will be participating in an all-star contest at a later date.

Question No. 19: Pursuant to Bylaw 17.1.6.7, a student-athlete who has exhausted his eligibility, but is eligible for practice under the five-year rule, is not subject to the time limits of Bylaw 17.1.6. Is it permissible for such a student-athlete to participate in more than one on-campus evaluation in a week?
Answer: Yes. The two-hour limitation on skill-related instruction does not apply to such student-athletes.

Question No. 20: Is a student-athlete who has exhausted his eligibility but is eligible for practice under the five-year rule subject to the prohibition on conditioning and skill-related instruction from one week prior to the institution’s final exam period through the conclusion of the student-athlete’s final exams?
Answer: Yes.

[References: Bylaws 13.10.5 (prospective student-athlete visit), 13.11.2.1 (on-campus evaluations — men’s basketball), 13.11.2.6.1.2 (exception — on-campus evaluation — men’s basketball), 17.02.1 (countable athletically related activity), 17.1.6 (time limits for athletically related activity), 17.1.6.2.1.1.4 (summer athletic activities — men’s basketball), 17.1.6.2.1.1.4.1 (exception to summer school enrollment — academic requirements — men’s basketball), 17.1.6.2.1.1.4.1.1 (application to transfer student-athletes), 17.1.6.2.2 (skill instruction — sports other than baseball and football) and 17.1.6.7 (exception — eligibility exhausted)]

Daily Compliance Item- 12/4/12- 13.11.1.2, 13.12.1.1.1- Definition of Men’s Basketball Prospect

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University are very interested in recruiting a few 7th graders they have seen on film.  Is it permissible for the coaches to call them or go visit them in their homes since they have not yet started classes in the 9th grade?

No.  NCAA Educational Column- 11/30/12- Men’s Basketball — Definition of a Prospective Student-Athlete for Tryouts and Camps and Clinics (I)- states that NCAA Division I member institutions should note that, pursuant to NCAA Division I Bylaws 13.11.1.2 and 13.12.1.1.1, for the purposes of tryouts and camps and clinics legislation in men’s basketball, a prospective student-athlete is defined as an individual who has started classes for the seventh grade. This definition is not applicable to other recruiting bylaws (e.g., telephone calls, official visits and contact restrictions).

The following questions and answers are designed to assist member institutions in applying the legislation.

 

Question: Is it permissible for a men’s basketball coach to provide recruiting materials, including general correspondence related to athletics, to seventh or eighth graders or their parents or legal guardians?

Answer: No. The legislation that defines a prospective student-athlete for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation does not change the permissible time period for providing recruiting materials to men’s basketball prospective student-athletes. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.4.1, in men’s basketball, it is not permissible to provide recruiting materials, including general correspondence related to athletics, to an individual or his parents or legal guardians until June 15 at the conclusion of his sophomore year in high school or, for a prospective student-athlete who attends an educational institution that uses a nontraditional calendar (e.g., Southern Hemisphere), the day after the conclusion of the his sophomore year in high school.

 

Question: Is it permissible for a men’s basketball coach to place telephone calls to seventh or eighth graders?

Answer: No. The legislation that defines a prospective student-athlete for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation does not change the permissible time period for placing telephone calls to men’s basketball prospective student-athletes. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.1.3.1.3, it is not permissible for an institutional coaching staff member to make telephone calls to a men’s basketball prospective student-athlete before June 15 of the prospective student-athlete’s sophomore year in high school or, for a prospective student-athlete who attends an educational institution that uses a nontraditional calendar (e.g., Southern Hemisphere), the day after the conclusion of his sophomore year in high school.

 

Question: May a men’s basketball coach make in-person off-campus recruiting contacts with seventh and eighth graders?

Answer: No. The legislation that defines a prospective student-athlete for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation does not change the permissible time period for off-campus contact with men’s basketball prospective student-athletes. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.1.1.1.1, off-campus recruiting contacts may not be made with a men’s basketball prospective student-athlete or his relatives or legal guardians before the opening day of classes for the prospective student-athlete’s junior year in high school.

 

Question: May a seventh or eighth grader be provided an official (paid) visit?

Answer: No. The legislation that defines a prospective student-athlete for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation does not change the date of the first opportunity for men’s basketball prospective student-athletes to receive expense-paid visits. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.6.2.2.1, it is not permissible for a prospective student-athlete to be provided an official visit earlier than January 1 of the prospective student athlete’s junior year of high school.

 

Question: Is it permissible to conduct a boys basketball camp for seventh and eighth graders on an institution’s campus during a dead period?

Answer: No. An institutional sports camp or clinic is defined as camp or clinic that is owned or operated by a member institution, or an employee of the athletics department, and in which prospective student-athletes participate. Seventh and eighth graders are considered prospective student-athletes for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation; therefore, pursuant to Bylaw 13.12.1.3, institutional boys basketball camps and clinics for seventh and eighth graders may not be conducted during a dead period.

 

Question: May an institution conduct a boys basketball camp or clinic for seventh or eighth graders during the months of June, July or August?

Answer: Yes. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.12.1.1.4, an institution may only conduct an institutional boys basketball camp during the months of June, July or August.

 

Question: May an institution’s men’s basketball coach or noncoaching staff member with basketball-specific duties be employed at another institution’s or noninstitutional boys basketball camp or clinic that includes seventh and eighth graders?

Answer: No. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.12.2.3.2, an institution’s coaching staff member or noncoaching staff member with basketball-specific duties (other than a manager) may only be employed at his or her institution’s camps or clinics.

 

Question: May a basketball coaching staff member attend noninstitutional basketball events, such as camps, leagues, tournaments in which seventh or eighth graders participate during the April or summer evaluation periods?

Answer: Unless the event is certified per Bylaw 13.18, no, it is not permissible for a coach to attend noninstitutional basketball events that include seventh and eighth graders during the April or summer evaluation periods.

 

[References: Division I Bylaws 13.1.1.1 (time period for off-campus contacts — general rule), 13.1.3.1.3 (exception — men’s basketball), 13.1.7.8. (basketball evaluations), 13.4.1 (recruiting materials), 13.6.2.2.1 (first opportunity to visit), 13.11.1.2 (definition of “prospective student-athlete” for tryout purposes – men’s basketball), 13.12.1.1.1 (definition of prospective student-athlete – men’s basketball), 13.12.1.1.4 (basketball), 13.12.1.5 (recruiting calendar exceptions), 13.12.1.7.1 (general rule), 13.12.2.3.2 (institutional/noninstitutional privately owned camps/clinic — basketball) and 13.18 (summer basketball event certification — men’s basketball); an official interpretation (7/13/05, Item No. 1); and a staff interpretation (4/6/94, Item No. a)]

 

This legislation is applicable to Division I.

Daily Compliance Item- 10/15/12- 17.3.3.1(a), 17.3.5.3(h)- Basketball Practice Scrimmage

Trip L Double and Dub L Double are two prospective student-athletes interested in playing basketball at Ocean State University (OSU) next year.  OSU is conducting an informal practice scrimmage next weekend and would like both prospects to attend.  During the weekend of the scrimmage, Trip will be taking an OFFICIAL visit and Dub will be taking an UNOFFICIAL visit to OSU’s campus.  Which of the following is true?

A.  Trip may attend the scrimmage

B.  Dub may attend the scrimmage

C.  Both Trip and Dub may attend the scrimmage

D.  Neither Trip or Dub may attend the scrimmage

The answer is ANCAA Educational Column- 5/1/08-Informal Basketball Practice Scrimmages (I)– states that NCAA Division I institutions should note that in basketball, NCAA Bylaw 17.3.5.3(h) (practice scrimmage) permits an informal practice scrimmage with outside competition to be exempted from an institution’s maximum number of contests, provided:  (1) the scrimmage is conducted in private (i.e., not open to the public) and without official scoring; and (2) only those athletics department staff members necessary to conduct the scrimmage are present during the scrimmage.

In basketball, an institution may play two practice scrimmages during any year it does not use an exemption set forth in Bylaw 17.3.5.3-(g) (exhibition against a non-NCAA Division I four-year collegiate institution) or may play one practice scrimmage and one exhibition contest against a non-NCAA Division I four-year collegiate institution.

Below are some commonly asked questions and answers designed to assist Division I institutions in applying this legislation.

Question:  When is the first opportunity to conduct a practice scrimmage?

Answer:    The first opportunity to conduct a practice scrimmage is the same day as the first opportunity to practice [i.e., 5 p.m. the Friday nearest October 15 (effective August 1, 2008)].  Further, a practice scrimmage may be conducted at any point during the season.

Question:  May the practice scrimmage be published on the institution’s season schedule?

Answer:    No.  The practice scrimmage may not be included on the institution’s published season schedule.

Question:  May the practice scrimmage count against either of the participating institutions’ won/loss records?

Answer:    No.  The practice scrimmage may not count against either team’s won/loss records.

Question:  May anyone (e.g., media; student-athletes’ families) other than the participating institutions’ coaches, student-athletes, athletics department staff members (e.g., trainers, managers) attend the practice scrimmage?

Answer:   Only athletics department staff members and those individuals necessary to conduct the practice scrimmage may be present during the scrimmage.  Further, the institution must ensure the scrimmage is free from public view and media are not in attendance.

Question May prospective student-athletes attend the practice scrimmage?

Answer:    Only prospective student-athletes (and those accompanying the prospective student-athletes) who are making official visits to the host institution may attend the practice scrimmage.  Prospective student-athletes on unofficial visits may not attend such a practice scrimmage.

Question:  If the facility in which the practice scrimmage is conducted is a facility that is normally open to the general public or student body during the time of the scrimmage, may the general public or student body attend the scrimmage?

Answer:    No.  Only athletics department staff members and those individuals necessary to conduct the practice scrimmage may be present during the scrimmage.

Question:  May the host institution’s statistics crew work the practice scrimmage?

Answer:    Yes.  The host institution’s statistics crew may work the practice scrimmage even if members of the crew are not members of the host institution’s athletics department staff.

Question: May an official score and/or statistics for the practice scrimmage be kept?

Answer:   No.  An official score and/or statistics for the practice scrimmage may not be kept.  However, an institution may keep score and/or statistics for private use.  The institution may not post the score and/or statistics in a newspaper, on the participating institutions’ Web sites, conferences’ Web sites or any other location.  In addition, an institution may not provide the score and/or any statistics to any type of media outlet.

Question:  May a coach or the student-athletes of either team participate in an interview with the media?

Answer:    The coach or student-athletes of either team may participate in an interview with the media, provided the comments are limited to the practice scrimmage in general and the interview was not established by either school to promote the scrimmage.  The coach or student-athletes may not comment specifically on the score or team and/or individual student-athlete statistics.

Question:  May the practice scrimmage be videotaped?

Answer:    Both teams may videotape the practice scrimmage as long as the footage is used only by the participating teams and is not published in any manner (e.g., posted on a participating institution’s Web site, video may not be provided to other institutions for scouting).

Question:  Do the daily and weekly hour limitations apply to the practice scrimmage?

Answer:    All student-athletes participating in the practice scrimmage are subject to the daily and weekly hour limitations.  A practice scrimmage is considered to be a contest.  Therefore, participation in the practice scrimmage and any associated athletically related activities count as three hours regardless of the actual duration of the scrimmage or associated athletically related activities.

Question:  May practice (e.g., review of videotape) be conducted after the scrimmage?

Answer:    No.  A practice scrimmage is considered to be a contest and practice may not be conducted following competition.

[References: Bylaws 17.1.6.3.2 (competition day), 17.1.6.3.2.1 (practice prohibited after competition), 17.5.3.1 (practice scrimmages), 17.5.5.3 (annual exemptions) and a staff interpretation, (11/8/06, Item No. 1)]