Daily Compliance Item- 11/12/13- 13.4.1.1.1, 13.9.2.1- Mailing NLIs

The women’s basketball staff at Ocean State University is preparing its National Letter of Intent (NLI) packets to be sent out today via federal express.  Included in this mailing is the NLI, NLI instructions, institutional financial aid agreement and a sports information questionnaire.

Are all of these items permitted to be in this packet?

 

 

No.  It is not permissible to send a questionnaire using express mail services.  NCAA Bylaw 13.4.1.1.1 states that an institution is not permitted to use express mail delivery services and may only use first-class mail or a lesser rate of service (e.g., parcel post) with no extra services (e.g., certified mail, delivery confirmation) to provide permissible printed recruiting materials to prospective student-athletes, their parents or legal guardians, their coaches or any other individual responsible for teaching or directing an activity in which a prospective student-athlete is involved, who resides within the 50 United States, other than the National Letter of Intent or other written admissions and/or financial aid commitment to attend the institution and necessary pre-enrollment information per Bylaw 13.4.1.1-(h).  [D] (Adopted: 4/28/05 effective 8/1/05,  Revised:  5/12/05, 1/14/08, 4/15/08)

NCAA Bylaw 13.9.2.1 states that an institutional or conference financial aid form may be included in the normal mailing of the National Letter of Intent, but none of the forms enclosed in the mailing may be signed by the prospective student-athlete prior to the initial signing date in that sport in the National Letter of Intent program. [D] (8/5/04)

 

PLEASE NOTE:  This is an actual fact pattern of a Division I secondary rules violation posted on LSDBi.  

Daily Compliance Item- 8/7/13- 14.4.3.1.6- Additional Football PTD Requirement

Hash Mark is a football student-athlete at Ocean State University. Here is Hash’s academic record for the 2012-13 academic year:

Fall 2012 semester- 6 degree applicable hours

Spring 2013 semester- 15 degree applicable hours

Summer 2013- 6 degree applicable hours

For this example, Hash is meeting the other progress toward degree requirements for GPA and % of degree.

Will Hash be eligible to compete during the 2013 season?

 

Yes with conditions.  NCAA Bylaw 14.4.3.1.6 states that in football, a student-athlete who is a member of the institution’s football team and who does not successfully complete at least nine-semester hours or eight-quarter hours of academic credit during the fall term or does not earn the Academic Progress Rate eligibility point for the fall term or does not successfully complete either requirement shall not be eligible to compete in the first four contests against outside competition in the following playing season.  (Adopted:  4/28/11 effective 8/1/11, Revised:  5/28/13)

Because Hash earned 27 academic credits prior to the start of the fall 2013 term, he can regain some or all of his eligibility back for the 2013 season.

NCAA Bylaw 14.4.3.1.6.1 states that a student-athlete who is ineligible, pursuant to Bylaw 14.4.3.1.6, to compete in the first four contests of a playing season against outside competition may regain eligibility to compete in the third and fourth contests of that season, provided he or she successfully completes at least 27-semester hours or 40-quarter hours of academic credit before the beginning of the next fall term.  A student-athlete in his or her initial year of full-time collegiate enrollment may use credit hours earned at the certifying institution during the summer prior to initial full-time enrollment and credit hours earned during the summer following the regular academic year to satisfy the 27-semester/40-quarter credit-hour requirement.  (Adopted:  4/28/11 effective 8/1/11, Revised: 2/6/12)

NCAA Bylaw 14.4.3.1.6.2 states that one time during a student-athlete’s five-year period of eligibility, a student-athlete who does not successfully complete at least nine-semester hours or eight-quarter hours of academic credit during the fall term or earn the Academic Progress Rate eligibility point for the fall term may regain eligibility to compete in the first four contests against outside competition in the following playing season, provided he or she successfully completes at least 27-semester hours or 40-quarter hours of academic credit before the beginning of the next fall term.  A student-athlete in his or her initial year of full-time collegiate enrollment may use credit hours earned at the certifying institution during the summer prior to initial full-time enrollment and credit hours earned during the summer following the regular academic year to satisfy the 27-semester/40-quarter credit-hour requirement.  (Adopted: 4/28/11 effective 8/1/11, Revised: 2/6/12)

Daily Compliance Item 7/19/13- NIT vs. NCAA Championships

From an NCAA legislative standpoint, is the National Invitational Tournament (NIT) considered an NCAA Championship?

 

No.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 7/8/13- Distinction between National Invitation Tournament and NCAA Championships (I) – states that for purposes of applying NCAA legislation, the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is not an NCAA championship.

Every year institutions have questions on how to apply NCAA legislation and/or interpretations when their student-athletes are participating in the NIT.  Although the interpretation is brief, below are the many bylaw references to which the interp will apply.

 

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 13.1.8.4 (NCAA promotional activities exception); 14.1.7.2.1.3.1 (exception-quarter institution); 14.1.9 (change in eligibility status); 14.5.1.4 (eligibility for championship in progress); 16.6.1.1 (expenses for spouse/children to postseason football game or NCAA championship); 16.8.1.2.1.1 (exceptions); 16.8.1.5.1 (general rule); 16.8.1.6 (incidental expenses at NCAA championships, national governing body championships in emerging sports and bowl games); 17.1.6.6.2.1 (exception — championship practice); 17.1.6.6.3.1 (exceptions); 17.1.7 (general regulations for computing playing seasons applicable to all sports); 17.2.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.3.4 (annual exemptions); 17.3.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.4.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.5.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.7.5.2 (annual exemptions); 17.8.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.9.5.2 (annual exemptions); 17.10.5.2 (annual exemptions); 17.11.5.2 (annual exemptions); 17.12.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.13.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.14.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.15.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.18.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.19.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.20.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.21.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.22.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.24.9 (annual exemptions); 17.25.5.3 (annual exemptions); 17.26.5.3 (annual exemptions); and Figure 16-1]

Daily Compliance Item- 5/31/13- Current Event

Today will be the last day for the “daily” compliance items.  I will continue to send out “hot topic emails” throughout the summer and will resume regular delivery in August.  I hope you all get some much needed time away from the office during the next couple of months!

 

Believe it or not, washing a car with university water can be an NCAA violation

sports.yahoo.com

At a time when college athletics is overrun with rogue agents, unscrupulous coaches and handlers who exploit athletes for money, it’s reassuring to know not every unrepentant rule-breaker goes unpunished.

Hearty congratulations to the NCAA for penalizing a student-athlete from a West Coast Conference school for the unspeakable crime of washing her car with the university’s water and hose.

Portland basketball coach Eric Reveno tweeted about the violation Wednesday after he learned of it during conference meetings, punctuating his message with the hashtag #stopinsanity. A spokesman for the WCC did not know any further details, but a source familiar with the circumstances revealed what happened.

A WCC school self-reported an extra benefits violation when university officials caught one of their women’s golfers washing her car on campus, according to the source. A secondary violation was ruled to have occurred because the water and hose were not available to regular students and requested the golfer pay back $20, which was deemed to be the value of the water and use of the hose.

NCAA spokeswoman Dana Thomas emailed Thursday that her organization did not participate in the decision and does not consider the car wash to have been an extra benefits violation. Asked why the golfer was penalized, Thomas said “it seems there was a miscommunication at some level” and the WCC is working with the school to clarify.

A WCC spokesman did not immediately return an email seeking further explanation of what happened.

That school administrators actually reported the violation and a penalty was initially assessed is equal parts hilarious and exasperating. What’s next? Charging athletes by the sip at drinking fountains? Or by the gallon after locker room showers?

Too many petty rules like this one or the one governing the use of bagel spreads continue to choke the system and prevent administrators at the school, conference and NCAA levels from focusing on what’s important. Reform is needed throughout college athletics, yet its leaders are too busy calculating the value of a couple buckets of soapy water to attack the real issues.

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Daily Compliance Item- 5/30/13- 16.11.2.1- Thank You Gift to a Parent

Ocean State University(OSU) women’s golf team participated in the NCAA championships.  One of the student-athlete’s parents lives in the locale of where the regional was conducted, so the team stayed at the parent’s house.  As a thank you for their hospitality, the coaches would like to send an edible fruit basket to the parents.  Is this permissible?

Yes.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 7/11/90-  Providing a gift to parents of a student-athlete for services rendered   – states that  in regard to a member institution that wishes to give the parents of a student-athlete a gift for providing the team lodging at their home during an away-from-home contest; determined that such an arrangement would not be considered an extra benefit, provided the gift is of nominal value (e.g., a meal, flowers) and is in exchange for services the parents rendered.

Daily Compliance Item- 5/29/13- 15.3.4.2.5- Relinquish Aid

R.B.I is a prospect that signed a National Letter of Intent to play baseball at Ocean State University (OSU) next year.  R.B.I will attend summer school (on athletics aid) prior to enrolling this fall.  R.B.I does not qualify for any institutional aid and therefore will only receive athletics aid (50%).  R.B.I gets hurt during his summer league play and might not be able to play at OSU during the 2013-14 academic year.  With the severity of his injury uncertain, R.B.I. tells the coach that he would like to relinquish his athletic aid for the 2013-14 academic year and have his parents pay for his educational expenses.

Is it possible for R.B.I. to relinquish his aid and allow OSU to provide that money to another student-athlete?

No.  NCAA Bylaw 15.3.4.2.5 states that before becoming a counter for an academic year pursuant to a one-year grant-in-aid, if a prospective student-athlete or student-athlete is awarded institutional financial aid unrelated to athletics that is of equal or greater value than his or her signed award of athletically related financial aid, the prospective student-athlete or student-athlete may, on his or her initiative, release the institution of its obligation to provide the athletically related financial aid. 

NCAA Staff Interpretation- 9/21/11-  Student-Athlete’s Voluntary Release of Institution’s Obligation to Provide Athletically Related Financial Aid (I)- states that once a prospective or enrolled student-athlete signs an institution’s financial aid agreement, it is not permissible to voluntarily release the institution’s obligation to provide athletically related financial aid, except under the conditions set forth in the release of obligation to provide athletically related financial aid legislation.

Daily Compliance Item- 5/28/13- 11.7.4.3- Baton Rule

With the spring evaluation period coming to an end, the football coaches at Ocean State University want to make sure they get in a few last recruiting trips.  The total number of permissible recruiters is on the road recruiting today and the first assistant coach will complete his recruiting activities at noon.  Another assistant coach will replace him and begin recruiting at 1pm today.  The first assistant coach would like to recruit again tomorrow.  Does he have to return to campus prior to engaging in additional recruiting activities?

Yes.  NCAA Bylaw 11.7.4.3 states that it is permissible for a coach to leave campus to engage in off-campus contact or evaluation before another coach who is off campus actually returns to campus, provided the total number of coaches recruiting on behalf of the institution at any time does not exceed the permissible number.  The coach being replaced must complete his or her recruiting activities before another coach may begin any off-campus recruiting activity.  Further, the replaced coach may not engage in additional recruiting activities until after he or she has returned to the institution’s campus.

Please note with the adoption of RWG-11-4, the limitation on the number of coaches who may recruit off-campus at any one time has been eliminated.  This legislation as an August 1, 2013 effective date.