Daily Compliance Item- 11.11.16- 13.1.2.2- Booster Who is a Newspaper Reporter Interviewing Prospect

Ocean State University (OSU) should get its first ever recruit from the state of Alaska. Aanaq, a men’s basketball prospect is supposed to sign an NLI with OSU today. An OSU booster lives in Alaska and works for The Anchorage Dispatch, a local newspaper. If Aanaq signs the NLI to play basketball for OSU, the booster would like to interview him about being the first student-athlete from the state to attend OSU.

Is it permissible for this individual to interview Aanaq?

Yes with conditions. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 7/21/93- Booster who works with a media entity having contact with prospective student-athlete- states that a media entity (e.g., radio, talk show host, newspaper reporter) who also is a representative of an institution’s athletics interests may have contact with a prospective student-athlete, provided the contact is through a normal working relationship and not for the purpose of recruiting the prospective student-athlete.

[References: 13.1.2.3 (general exceptions); 13.1.5.3 (contacts subsequent to signing NLI); 13.11.2 (radio/TV show), and 04/13/90 NCAA Interpretations Committee minutes, Item No. 6]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item 10.21.16- Current Event

Alabama’s medical tent is an idea popping up all over college football

USAToday.com

When Alabama played for the College Football Playoff title last season, its pop-up medical tent on the sideline was a matter of significant curiosity. There had never really been anything like it before in football, allowing an injured player to be examined privately without having to go back to the locker room.

The collapsible tent, which is attached to the base of a trainer’s table and then pulled over the top in a matter of seconds, was a fairly genius invention both in its practicality and design. And Jeff Allen, who conceived the project and debuted it last year as Alabama’s head football trainer and assistant athletics director for sports medicine, knew it would soon be in demand across football at all levels.

Along with two engineering students at Alabama who brought the idea to life, Allen has formed a company called Kinematic Sports to market and sell the “SidelinER” tent. Allen told USA TODAY Sports this week they’ve opened an office in Tuscaloosa and sold 45 tents to college football programs and another 10 to various customers including high schools and hospitals. According to the company’s Web site, a basic unit can be ordered for $5,000.

“It’s been amazing how this thing took off,” Allen said. “Even though I thought it was going to work, I’ll never forget the day I saw the prototype I was like, ‘Wow, this is going to work. I remember saying, once this thing get out there everybody is going to want one of these and that’s really the response that we’ve seen. We did not have to do a whole lot of marketing or advertising. It kind of took care of itself.”

Now Clemson has one, as does Ohio State, Louisville, Arkansas, Marshall, SMU, Troy, West Virginia, Northwestern, Ole Miss, Florida State and on and on and on. It probably won’t be long before nearly every FBS program has one, but it’s not simply a matter of trying to mimic Alabama.

Besides being easy to transport, the opportunity for a medical training staff to examine a player at a moment of distress and potential panic without 100,000 people peering in can be a valuable tool.

“It just makes so much sense in terms of protecting the privacy of the athlete, and the other thing I found medically is it changes the environment of trying to do an evaluation on an injured athlete without the distraction of the crowd,” Allen said. “I tell people the most critical time in evaluating is five-to-10 minutes after the injury, and to have that type of environment makes a difference. I notice a big difference in our athletes in there. They request it like, ‘let’s go.’ So it’s really been amazing.”

The success of this project could lead to more in the future. In June, Alabama’s board of trustees approved the Integrative Center for Athletic and Sport Technology (I-CAST), which connects athletics with people in engineering, kinesiology and sports medicine and will try to develop new technologies to benefit performance and injury recovery.

“It’s going to benefit our athletic department and the university,” Allen said. “It’s a great example of the collaboration that Alabama has between athletics and academics. It’s not the norm at a lot of places but we’re lucky here with the culture and climate the way it is.”

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.17.16- 12.5.2.1- Student-Athlete Endorsement of Political Candidate

Several student-athletes at Ocean State University have been very enthusiastic about this year’s Presidential race. With all of the limitations pertaining to student-athletes’ endorsements, are these student-athletes permitted to endorse their preferred candidate?
Yes with conditions. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 12/30/87- Student-athlete endorsement of political candidate- states that enrolled student-athletes could be involved in the endorsement of a political candidate provided the student-athletes receive no remuneration for their involvement and are not obligated to make any time commitments; suggested that the following disclaimer be utilized in any press releases containing their names:

“The student-athletes are acting as citizens of the state, and do not necessarily represent the views of their institutions of higher education or the NCAA.”

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.13.16- 17.3.2.1- Men’s Basketball Pre-Season Practice

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University (OSU) are planning out the pre-season schedule. A couple of the student-athletes have a lab during the scheduled practice time on thursday. If those student-athletes practice on a different day, will that day count against OSU’s 30 practice dates?
Yes. NCAA Bylaw 17.3.2.1 states that an institution shall not commence on-court preseason basketball practice sessions before the date that is 42 days before the date of the institution’s first regular-season contest. An institution shall not engage in more than 30 days of countable athletically related activities before its first regular-season contest. Any countable athletically related activities (e.g., conditioning, skill-related instruction) that occur within the 42-day period shall count against the 30 days of countable athletically related activities. (Revised: 4/28/05 effective 8/1/05, 1/14/08 effective 8/1/08, 5/2/13 effective 8/1/13, 1/15/14)
Please note the reference to “team” in the rationale of NCAA Proposal 2011-85. The NCAA has confirmed that the 30 designated practice days cannot apply to individual student-athletes.
The most recent modification to the first permissible contest date in men’s basketball reduced the number of preseason practice opportunities by up to seven days. This proposal allows the number of practice days in men’s basketball to remain at a maximum of 30, which is generally consistent with the number of practice opportunities permitted prior to the adoption of the current legislation. Additionally, this proposed flexible preseason practice schedule permits coaches to best use practice and off days to benefit student-athletes prior to the first contest. While the existing preseason practice schedule essentially dictates that practice must occur during every possible day, the flexible approach offered in this proposal provides each coach with the ability to determine when to use the practice opportunities depending on the team’s needs and the academic calendar. For example, a coach may provide the team with days off to study for midterm exams, to take advantage of fall vacation periods or to recover from injuries.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 9.30.16- Current Event

NCAA payouts may reward academic skills, not just athletic ones

USATODAY.com

For decades, colleges’ performances in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament have had an impact on how the association annually divides hundreds of millions of dollars in TV revenue among its Division I conferences.

Now, the NCAA is set to vote on making the academic performance of athletes in all sports a factor for the first time.

A special committee has recommended to the NCAA’s top governing boards that they let athletic departments’ ability to meet at least one of three academic benchmarks annually determine how much money their respective conferences receive from a new pool of money that would be funded by future increases in the association’s media rights fees.

The recommendation is included in the final report of the NCAA Division I Values-Based Revenue Distribution Working Group, a copy of which was obtained this week by USA TODAY Sports.

The NCAA Board of Governors and the Division I Board of Directors are expected to vote on the group’s recommendations during meetings scheduled for the last week in October.

The proposed academics-based distribution fund would debut in the NCAA’s 2019-2020 fiscal year. During its first six years, it would get 75% of the annual TV rights fee increases. That means it would start with nearly $12.7 million in 2019-2020, then rapidly grow to a little more than $105.4 million in 2024-25, according to the working group’s report.

At that amount — and based on the working group’s projection that about two-thirds of the more than 340 Division I schools will meet at least one of the required benchmarks each year — a conference would get about $460,000 for each school that qualifies.

After that, the fund would continue growing annually, but by much smaller amounts.

The academic-based fund’s growth would not prevent increases in the NCAA’s other Division I revenue distribution funds, including the one based on schools’ performance in the basketball tournament. And the basketball fund would continue to have more money in it each year than would the academic-based fund.

According to the NCAA’s most recent audited financial statement, it is due to receive $827 million in 2019-2020 from its current 14-year, $10.8 billion TV and marketing deal with CBS and Turner. In April, the NCAA announced it had made an eight-year, $8.8 billion extension of the CBS/Turner deal.

The NCAA working group’s final report states that the group initially had suggested that 100% of the annual growth in the media rights deal be allocated to the academics-based fund, but feedback from the association’s membership prompted it to alter its approach.

Schools would annually earn an academic fund payment for their conference if their overall athlete populations meet any of three criteria:

– An Academic Performance Rate (APR) of at least 985 for the previous year. The APR is based on whether athletes maintain their eligibility and return to school for each academic term.

– A Graduation Success Rate (GSR) of at least 90 for the most recent year. The GSR is based on the number of athletes who graduate within six years of entering college, with school’s receiving consideration for athletes who transfer or leave school early while in good academic standing.

– A Federal graduation rate for the most recent year that is at least 13 percentage points greater than that of the entire undergraduate student body. Under the Federal rate, if an athlete initially enrolls at one school, then transfers, the athlete is deemed to have not graduated from the initial school and counts against its graduation rate, regardless of the athlete’s academic standing at the time or their eventual academic outcome.

Each conference would receive money from the NCAA based on the total number of payment units earned by its member schools. The conferences would then be able to distribute the money based on their own revenue-sharing systems. Thus, it would be possible for a school that does not earn an academic-based unit to receive money from the fund anyway — in much the same way that schools whose teams do not play in a bowl game or NCAA basketball tournament receive shares of their conferences’ revenues from those events.

Once money from the academic fund reaches schools, they would be allowed to use it for any purpose — not just for academic initiatives. Other Division I revenue distribution funds carry restrictions on how the money can be used.

College presidents’ interest in examining the creation of an academic-based distribution fund has roots in an August 2015 meeting organized by the NCAA that was followed by the working group’s creation. Though the new TV deal makes it easier for the association’s membership to proceed now, groups such as the Knight Foundation Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics have pushed such a move for more than a decade.

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 9.19.16- 13.10.2.2- High School Coaches Serving as Institution’s Commentators

Ocean State University (OSU) broadcasts several events throughout the year on its own digital network. OSU produces the entire event and selects the talent for the competitions. There are a few high school basketball coaches in the area that OSU would like to hire as commentators.

Is OSU permitted to hire these individuals as commentators for the online broadcasts?

No. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 9/19/16- Participation as Color Commentator in the Institution’s Radio/TV/Web Programs (I)– states that institutions may permit individuals responsible for teaching or directing an activity in which prospective student-athletes are involved (e.g., high school, preparatory school or two-year college coach or administrator) to provide color commentary for the institution’s athletics program broadcasts, provided the employment of the individual is the sole responsibility of a third-party broadcast partner (e.g., radio station) and the member institution’s coaching staff does not participate in any portion of the program (e.g., pregame or postgame interviews).

[References: NCAA Bylaws: 13.10.2 (publicity before commitment), 13.10.2.2 (radio/tv show) and official interpretations (09/15/88 (item ref: 4); (07/26/89 (Item No. e) and a staff interpretation (12/20/89 (Item No. b), which have been archived]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office,
case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 9.15.16- 13.4.1.8- Audio/Video Materials to Recruits

Ocean State University women’s basketball coaches would to create animated files to send to recruits. Are there restrictions to follow with these types of items?

Yes. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 9/14/16- Animation is Video/Audio Material (I)– states that animation (e.g., animated GIF, interactive PDF) is video/audio material. Therefore, institutions must meet the parameters in pertaining to audio/video materials when creating such files. NCAA Bylaw 13.4.1.8 states that an institution may not produce video or audio materials to show to, play for or provide to a prospective student-athlete except as specified in this section. Permissible video or audio material may only be provided to a prospective student-athlete via permissible electronic correspondence, except as provided in Bylaw 13.4.1.8.4. [D] (Adopted: 1/11/94 effective 8/1/94, Revised: 1/9/96 effective 8/1/96, 12/12/06, 1/8/07, 1/16/10, 3/29/10, 4/28/11 effective 8/1/11, 6/13/11, 1/18/14 effective 8/1/14)

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.