Daily Compliance Item- 12.15.16- 11.7.1.1, 17.02.1- Sports Psychologist Attending Practice

The Ocean State University softball coaches noticed that a few of their student-athletes have not been performing very well at practice. Thinking the issues may not be athletically related, the coaches asked a sports psychologist to evaluate these student-athletes at yesterday’s skill instruction session.

The sports psychologist watched practice but did not have any contact with the student-athletes. After practice the coaches met with this individual to try to determine what the issues might be. The sports psychologist determined these student-athletes are having trouble focusing, so she asked to meet with them one on one. The coaches are requiring the student-athletes to meet with the sports psychologist this afternoon.

Which of the following is true?

A. The sports psychologist’s presence at practice does not require the institution to count her in the coaching limitations.
B. The individual session the student-athletes will have with the sports psychologist must be considered a countable athletically related activity.
C. Both A and B are true
D. Neither A or B are true

The answer is C. NCAA Official Interpretation- Use of Sports Psychologist (I)- states that a sports psychologist may attend practice sessions without being included in the institution’s coaching limitations in a particular sport, provided the individual does not provide any technical or tactical instruction related to the sport or make or assist in making tactical decisions related to the sport during on-court or on-field practice or competition. A sports psychologist may evaluate a student-athlete during a practice session only for the purposes of assisting the student-athlete in off-court or off-field noncoaching activities (e.g., mental imagery) directly related to the sport; however, if a student-athlete is required to meet with the sports psychologist, such a meeting is considered a countable athletically related activity.

Further, an institution may require a student-athlete to meet with a sports psychologist as a permissible out-of-season conditioning activity for the purposes of assisting the student-athlete in off-court or off-field noncoaching activities (e.g., mental imagery) directly related to the sport, provided the time engaged in such sessions is included in the maximum limit of eight hours per week for countable athletically related activities outside the playing season. In bowl subdivision football, the sports psychologist does not have to count as one of the five strength and conditioning coaches permitted to work with the football program in any capacity.

[References: NCAA Bylaws 11.7.1.1 (countable coach); 17.02.1 (countable athletically related activities); 17.1.7.2 (weekly hour limitations — outside the playing season and staff interpretations, 12/12/14, Item b. which has been archived]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 12.13.16- 13.5.4, 16.8.1- Transportation to Campus Prior to Initial Enrollment

One N. One is prospective student-athlete that will be initially enrolling full-time at Ocean State University (OSU) in January. One has been accepted and is registered with a full-time course load for the spring 2017 term. Additionally, One has been certified as a full qualifier by the NCAA Eligibility Center. One’s first competition with the team will be an away game that takes place a couple of days prior to the start of the spring term. Since the spring term will be One’s initial enrollment, is it permissible for OSU to provide transportation expenses to return to the campus with the team after the game?

Yes with conditions. NCAA Official Interpretation- 4/13/16- Transportation Prior to Enrollment After Away-From-Home Competition (I)- states that an institution may provide an incoming student-athlete who joins the institution’s team at an away-from-home competition (e.g., foreign tour, regular-season competition) with expenses to travel to the institution after the competition to begin his or her initial enrollment at the institution, provided the student-athlete is eligible for competition.

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 13.5.4 (transportation prior to enrollment) and 16.8.1 (permissible) and an official interpretation (07/22/93, Item No. 5), which has been archived]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 12.12.16- 13.1.2.7- Off-Campus Contact with a PSA During an Unofficial Visit

Dee Cut is a prospective student-athlete interested in playing lacrosse at Ocean State University (OSU) next year. Dee is visiting OSU’s campus today and tomorrow on an unofficial visit. A few of the OSU lacrosse student-athletes are going to watch Monday Night Football at a restaurant near campus and ask Dee if he would like to join them. Is it permissible for the OSU student-athletes to have contact with Dee off-campus?

Yes with conditions. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 12/8/16- Off-Campus Contact Between Enrolled Student or Student-Athlete and Prospective Student-Athlete During Unofficial Visit (I)– states that during an unofficial visit, off-campus contact may occur between an enrolled student or student-athlete and prospective student-athlete, regardless of whether the visit was arranged by the athletics department, provided any off-campus contact is not at the direction of a coaching staff member (e.g., coach tells the student-athlete to take the prospective student-athlete to get ice cream off campus).

[Reference: NCAA Division I Bylaw 13.1.2.7 (student-athletes and other enrolled students)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 12.8.16- 13.15.2.5- Hiring a Band Comprised of Prospects

During the break between fall and spring semesters, Ocean State University (OSU) will be participating in a bowl game as well as hosting a few men’s and women’s basketball games. OSU’s band is not able to participate in all these events, so is it permissible for OSU to hire a local high school band to perform at the home basketball games?

Yes. NCAA Bylaw 13.15.2.5 states that an institution may hire a band (e.g., marching band, pep band) comprised of prospective student-athlete-aged individuals to perform at its regular-season home contests and/or postseason home or away-from-home contests, provided the band is paid commensurate with the going rate in that locale for similar services and the organization providing the band is located within 150 miles of the competition site. (Adopted: 11/1/01 effective 8/1/02)

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office,
case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 12.7.16- 16.1.4- Student-Athlete Exchanging Award

The Ocean State University football student-athletes will receive rings for winning the Ocean Eleven Conference Championship game. A few of the student-athletes would like to exchange the ring for something else because they received a ring last year. Is it permissible to exchange the ring for another item?

No. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 12/5/13- Student-Athletes Selling Items Received for Participation in Intercollegiate Athletics (I) – states that a student-athlete may not sell, or exchange for another item of value, any item received for athletics participation. [References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 12.5.2.1 (advertisements and promotions after becoming a student-athlete); 12.1.2 (amateur status); 16.1.4 (types of awards, awarding agencies, maximum value and numbers of awards); and 16.11.2.1 (general rule)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office,
case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 11.11.16- 13.1.2.2- Booster Who is a Newspaper Reporter Interviewing Prospect

Ocean State University (OSU) should get its first ever recruit from the state of Alaska. Aanaq, a men’s basketball prospect is supposed to sign an NLI with OSU today. An OSU booster lives in Alaska and works for The Anchorage Dispatch, a local newspaper. If Aanaq signs the NLI to play basketball for OSU, the booster would like to interview him about being the first student-athlete from the state to attend OSU.

Is it permissible for this individual to interview Aanaq?

Yes with conditions. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 7/21/93- Booster who works with a media entity having contact with prospective student-athlete- states that a media entity (e.g., radio, talk show host, newspaper reporter) who also is a representative of an institution’s athletics interests may have contact with a prospective student-athlete, provided the contact is through a normal working relationship and not for the purpose of recruiting the prospective student-athlete.

[References: 13.1.2.3 (general exceptions); 13.1.5.3 (contacts subsequent to signing NLI); 13.11.2 (radio/TV show), and 04/13/90 NCAA Interpretations Committee minutes, Item No. 6]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item 10.21.16- Current Event

Alabama’s medical tent is an idea popping up all over college football

USAToday.com

When Alabama played for the College Football Playoff title last season, its pop-up medical tent on the sideline was a matter of significant curiosity. There had never really been anything like it before in football, allowing an injured player to be examined privately without having to go back to the locker room.

The collapsible tent, which is attached to the base of a trainer’s table and then pulled over the top in a matter of seconds, was a fairly genius invention both in its practicality and design. And Jeff Allen, who conceived the project and debuted it last year as Alabama’s head football trainer and assistant athletics director for sports medicine, knew it would soon be in demand across football at all levels.

Along with two engineering students at Alabama who brought the idea to life, Allen has formed a company called Kinematic Sports to market and sell the “SidelinER” tent. Allen told USA TODAY Sports this week they’ve opened an office in Tuscaloosa and sold 45 tents to college football programs and another 10 to various customers including high schools and hospitals. According to the company’s Web site, a basic unit can be ordered for $5,000.

“It’s been amazing how this thing took off,” Allen said. “Even though I thought it was going to work, I’ll never forget the day I saw the prototype I was like, ‘Wow, this is going to work. I remember saying, once this thing get out there everybody is going to want one of these and that’s really the response that we’ve seen. We did not have to do a whole lot of marketing or advertising. It kind of took care of itself.”

Now Clemson has one, as does Ohio State, Louisville, Arkansas, Marshall, SMU, Troy, West Virginia, Northwestern, Ole Miss, Florida State and on and on and on. It probably won’t be long before nearly every FBS program has one, but it’s not simply a matter of trying to mimic Alabama.

Besides being easy to transport, the opportunity for a medical training staff to examine a player at a moment of distress and potential panic without 100,000 people peering in can be a valuable tool.

“It just makes so much sense in terms of protecting the privacy of the athlete, and the other thing I found medically is it changes the environment of trying to do an evaluation on an injured athlete without the distraction of the crowd,” Allen said. “I tell people the most critical time in evaluating is five-to-10 minutes after the injury, and to have that type of environment makes a difference. I notice a big difference in our athletes in there. They request it like, ‘let’s go.’ So it’s really been amazing.”

The success of this project could lead to more in the future. In June, Alabama’s board of trustees approved the Integrative Center for Athletic and Sport Technology (I-CAST), which connects athletics with people in engineering, kinesiology and sports medicine and will try to develop new technologies to benefit performance and injury recovery.

“It’s going to benefit our athletic department and the university,” Allen said. “It’s a great example of the collaboration that Alabama has between athletics and academics. It’s not the norm at a lot of places but we’re lucky here with the culture and climate the way it is.”

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.