Daily Compliance Item- 11/21/13- 13.14.3- Subscription to a Scouting Service

Which of the following is true with regard to a scouting/recruiting service?

A.  Institution has subscribed to a scouting/recruiting service when a staff members registers to access information only available to paid subscribers.

B.  Institution has subscribed to a scouting/recruiting service when a staff member registers to access information only available to a select group of individuals– regardless if there is a cost.

C.  Institution has subscribed to a scouting/recruiting service when a staff member registers to access information even if the same information is available to the general public at no cost.

D.  Both A & B are true.

 

 

The answer is DNCAA Staff Interpretation- 11/14/13- Subscribing to a Recruiting or Scouting Service (I) – states that  an institution is considered to have subscribed to a recruiting or scouting service when a staff member registers to access information provided by the service only to paid subscribers or registers to access information available only to a select group of individuals (e.g., coaches), regardless of whether a charge is associated with accessing the information. However, an institution is not considered to have subscribed to a recruiting or scouting service if a staff member registers to access information about prospective student-athletes from a service that provides the same information to the general public at no cost.

 

References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 13.14.3 (recruiting or scouting services); 13.14.3.1 (basketball and football); 13.14.3.2 (sports other than basketball and football); 13.14.3.3 (subscription limited to approved services – basketball and football); and staff interpretation (04/01/11, Item No. a)]

Daily Compliance Item- 11/19/13- 13.1.6.2- Communication During a PSA’s Competition

The Ocean State University Assistant Men’s Basketball coaches are going to attend a game tonight to watch Point Guard, one of their NLI signees, play.  Prior to the game, the coaches want to say hello to Point and wish him luck in the game.

 

Is it permissible for the coaches to have contact with Point on the day of his game?

 

Yes with conditions.  NCAA Educational Colum- 11/18/13-  NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Recruiting Model (I) – includes questions and answers that can assist  the membership in applying NCAA Division I legislation as it relates to the men’s basketball recruiting model.

 

Question No. 1: Do evaluation activities during the April evaluation periods count toward the 130 recruiting-person days restriction and the limit of seven recruiting opportunities per prospective student-athlete?

Answer: Yes. Evaluations during April must be included in the 130 recruiting-person days and count toward the limit of seven recruiting opportunities per prospective student-athlete. Note that if an event is conducted on consecutive days in a tournament format, an institution would only be charged with a single recruiting opportunity per prospective student-athlete.

 

Question No. 2: During recruiting periods, is it permissible for an institution’s coach to sit with a prospective student-athlete’s parents during the prospective student-athlete’s contest or to have in-person contact with the prospective student-athlete after the contest once he has been released?

Answer: No. It is not permissible to have in-person contact with a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s relatives or legal guardians during the day of the prospective student-athlete’s competition, including time before and after the competition.

 

Question No. 3: Is it permissible for an institution to make a telephone call to a prospective student-athlete who has reported on call for competition or competition-related activities?

Answer: No. It is not permissible to make a telephone call to a prospective student-athlete who has reported on call for competition or competition-related activities until he has been released by the appropriate institutional authority in accordance with the parameters of NCAA Bylaw 13.1.6.2.

 

Question No. 4: Is it permissible for an institution to send an email or other form of electronic correspondence (e.g., text message) to a prospective student-athlete who has reported on call for competition or competition-related activities?

Answer: It is not permissible to send electronic correspondence to a prospective student-athlete while he is on call for competition at the competition site (e.g., arena, stadium). However, it is permissible to send general correspondence (including electronic correspondence) to a prospective student-athlete while he is on call and not at the competition site, or while he is at any location, once released by the appropriate authority.

 

Question No. 5: Is it permissible for an institution to make a telephone call, send an email, or send another form of electronic correspondence (e.g., text message) to a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians while the prospective student-athlete is on call for competition or competition-related activities? What if the prospective student-athlete is participating in a certified event?

Answer: It is permissible to make a telephone call, send an email, or send another form of electronic correspondence (e.g., text message) to a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians while the prospective student-athlete is on call for competition or competition-related activities. Such communication may also occur with a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians while the prospective student-athlete is participating in a certified event. However, all communication with a prospective student-athlete’s coach or any individual associated with the prospective student-athlete as a result of the prospective student-athlete’s participation in basketball, directly or indirectly, is prohibited during the time period in which the prospective student-athlete is participating in a certified event.

 

Question No. 6: During the April evaluation periods, is it permissible for coaches to attend events other than certified events (e.g., noninstitutional organized events that are approved, sponsored or conducted by an applicable state, national or international governing body and are not organized and conducted primarily for a recruiting purpose)? Is it permissible for a coach to visit a high school to talk to a high school coach or pick up a transcript?

Answer: No. Evaluations of live athletics activities during the April evaluation periods are specifically limited to events that are certified pursuant to Bylaw 13.18. No other off-campus evaluation activities may occur during the April evaluation periods.

 

Question No. 7: During the academic year recruiting period, is it permissible for coaches to evaluate at an “open gym”?

Answer: It would be permissible for coaches to evaluate if the “open gym” (or pick-up game or similar activity) has been approved by the appropriate authority at the scholastic institution as a regular scholastic activity; it involves only students enrolled at the institution where the activity is occurring; and it is not organized for the purpose of permitting institutional coaches to observe the prospective student-athletes participating in the activity.

 

Question No. 8: During the July dead periods, may an institution conduct institutional camps and clinics?

Answer: As specified in Bylaw 13.12.1.5, institutions may not conduct institutional camps and clinics (those that include prospective student-athletes) during dead periods.

 

Question No. 9: If a prospective student-athlete making an official visit is a member of a nontraditional family (e.g., divorce, separation), is it permissible to provide travel expenses to more than two individuals?

Answer: No. It is only permissible to provide travel expenses in conjunction with an official visit to two individuals who are the prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians.

Question No. 10: May an institution pay the costs for a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians to receive meals and lodging while in transit to an official visit without starting the 48-hour official visit period?

Answer: Yes.

 

Question No. 11: May a coaching staff member have in-person contact with a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s relatives or legal guardians during a day of the prospective student-athlete’s competition, provided the prospective student-athlete has signed a National Letter of Intent (NLI) or has submitted a financial deposit in response to the institution’s offer of admission?

Answer: If a prospective student-athlete has signed a NLI or the institution’s written offer of admission and/or financial aid or the institution has received the prospective student-athlete’s financial deposit in response to the institution’s offer of admission, the restrictions of Bylaw 13.1, including restrictions on in-person contact with the prospective student-athlete and/or his relatives or legal guardians on a day of competition, no longer apply. However, the restrictions of Bylaw 13.1 continue to apply as they relate to other prospective student-athletes. Therefore, even if a prospective student-athlete who has signed a NLI is participating, it remains impermissible for a coaching staff member to attend an event that occurs outside of a recruiting or evaluation period. In addition, it is impermissible for a coaching staff member, while having contact with a prospective student-athlete who has signed a NLI, to place himself or herself in a position in which contact is possible with other prospective student-athletes and/or relative or legal guardians.

 

Question No. 12: Does the restriction on in-person contact on the date of competition apply only to a prospective student-athlete’s basketball competitions or all sports in which the prospective student-athlete competes?

Answer: The restriction on in-person contact applies to all contests in which a prospective student-athlete participates, not just basketball contests.

 

Editor’s Note: This column was updated November 18, 2013, to add an additional question (Question No. 12).

 

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 11.7.4.3.1 (exception — basketball — July evaluation periods), 13.02.5.3 (recruiting period — men’s basketball), 13.1.5.3 (contacts — men’s basketball), 13.1.6.2 (contact restrictions — competition site), 13.1.6.2.1 (additional restriction — men’s and women’s basketball), 13.1.6.2.1.1 (exceptions — men’s basketball), 13.1.7.8 (basketball evaluations), 13.4.1 (recruiting materials), 13.4.1.2.1 (electronic transmission — exception — men’s basketball), 13.5.2.6.1 (exception — transportation expenses for a prospective student-athletes parents or legal guardians — men’s basketball), 13.6.7.1.1 (meals and lodging while in transit) and 13.17.2 (recruiting calendar — men’s basketball)]

 

Notice about Educational Columns: Educational columns and hot topics are intended to assist the membership with the correct application of legislation and/or interpretations by providing clarifications, reminders and examples. They are based on legislation and official and staff interpretations applicable at the time of publication. Therefore, educational columns and hot topics are binding to the extent that the legislation and interpretations on which they are based remain applicable. Educational columns are posted on a regular basis to address a variety of issues and hot topics are posted as necessary in order to address timely issues.

Daily Compliance Item- 2/20/13- 16.2.1.1.1- Complimentary Admissions for a Conference Tournament

Alley Oop is a basketball student-athlete at Ocean State University.  Alley’s team will be participating in its conference tournament next week, and she would like to provide tickets to a few of her family members.  How many complimentary admissions may Alley provide?

A.  2

B.  4

C.  6

D.  None

The answer is CNCAA Bylaw 16.2.1.1.1 states that an institution may provide each student-athlete who participates in or is a member of a team participating in a postseason event (e.g., conference championship, NCAA championship, National Invitation Tournament, bowl game) with six complimentary admissions to all intercollegiate athletics events at the site at which the student (or team) participates.  (Adopted: 1/9/96 effective 8/1/96, Revised: 11/1/01 effective 8/1/02, 1/17/09 effective 8/1/09)

Daily Compliance Item- 2/13/13- 14.1.3, 14.1.4.3- NCAA Forms

Clay Court is a student at Ocean State University.  Clay decided to try out for the men’s tennis team at the beginning of the spring 2013 term.  Clay has been practicing for five days and will compete in Ocean State University’s home meet this weekend.  Which statement is true?

A.  Clay does not have to complete the NCAA Drug-Testing Consent form until he has participated in countable athletically related activities for 14 days.

B.  Clay must complete the NCAA Drug-Testing Consent form prior to competing in the competition this weekend.

C.  Clay must complete the Student-Athlete Statement prior to competing in the meet this weekend.

D.  Both B & C are true

The answer is DNCAA Bylaw 14.1.3 states that prior to participation in intercollegiate competition each academic year, a student-athlete shall sign a statement in a form prescribed by the Legislative Council in which the student athlete submits information related to eligibility, recruitment, financial aid, amateur status, previous positive-drug tests administered by any other athletics organization and involvement in organized gambling activities related to intercollegiate or professional athletics competition under the Association’s governing legislation. Failure to complete and sign the statement shall result in the student-athlete’s ineligibility for participation in all intercollegiate competition. Violations of this bylaw do not affect a student-athlete’s eligibility if the violation occurred due to an institutional administrative error or oversight, and the student-athlete subsequently signs the form; however, the violation shall be considered an institutional violation per Constitution 2.8.1.

NCAA Bylaw 14.1.4.3 states that a student-athlete who is “trying out” for a team is not required to complete the form until 14 days from the first date the student-athlete engages in countable athletically related activities or before the student-athlete participates in a competition, whichever occurs earlier.  (Adopted:  4/27/06 effective 8/1/06)

Daily Compliance Item- 12/13/12- 12.3.1.1, 12.3.1.2- Agents

Post Route and Out Route are football student-athletes at Ocean State University.  Based on the below scenarios which, if either, would have eligibility issues regarding their interaction with an agent?

Post Route met with an agent on campus while preparing for a bowl game.  The agent indicated he would like to represent Post once his eligibility has exhausted.  Post liked what the agent had to say and was impressed with his client list.  Consequently, Post verbally agreed to have this agent represent him once he returned to campus after the bowl game.

Out Route met with an agent on campus while preparing for a bowl game.  The agent indicated that although he was very impressed with Out’s athletic ability, he only represents professional basketball players.  He gave Out 2 concert tickets and wished him luck with the football career.

  1. Both Post and Out would be ineligible
  2. Neither student-athlete would lose eligibility
  3. Post would be ineligible
  4. Out would be ineligible

 

The answer is 1.  NCAA Bylaw 12.3.1.1 states that  an individual shall be ineligible per Bylaw 12.3.1 if he or she enters into a verbal or written agreement with an agent for representation in future professional sports negotiations that are to take place after the individual has completed his or her eligibility in that sport.   

NCAA Bylaw 12.3.1.2 states that an individual shall be ineligible per Bylaw 12.3.1 if he or she (or his or her relatives or friends) accepts transportation or other benefits from: (Revised: 1/14/97)

(a) Any person who represents any individual in the marketing of his or her athletics ability. The receipt of such expenses constitutes compensation based on athletics skill and is an extra benefit not available to the student body in general; or

(b) An agent, even if the agent has indicated that he or she has no interest in representing the student-athlete in the marketing of his or her athletics ability or reputation and does not represent individuals in the student-athlete’s sport. (Adopted: 1/14/97)

Daily Compliance Item- 10/25/12- 13.9.1- Requirements to Send Offer of Athletic Aid

Ocean State University is preparing for the upcoming National Letter of Intent (NLI) early signing period.  Which of the following is true with regard to the requirements that must be met before the coaches can send a prospect an NLI and written offer of athletic aid?

 

A.  Prospect must be placed on Ocean State University’s institutional request list (IRL) with the NCAA Eligibility Center

B.  Prospect must complete the NCAA Eligibility Center amateurism  certification questionnaire

C.  Prospect must register with the NCAA Eligibility Center

D.  All of the above

 

The answer is DNCAA Bylaw 13.9.1 states that the following requirements must be met before an institution may provide a written offer of athletically related financial aid (per Bylaw 15.3.2.3) to a prospective student-athlete:  [D] (Adopted:  4/26/07 effective 8/1/07, Revised: 4/30/09 effective 8/1/10)

(a) A high school or preparatory school prospective student-athlete must register with the NCAA Eligibility Center;

(b) A high school or preparatory school prospective student-athlete must be placed on the institution’s institutional request list (IRL) with the NCAA Eligibility Center; and

(c) A high school, preparatory school  or transfer (if applicable) prospective student-athlete must complete the amateurism certification questionnaire administered by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Daily Compliance Item- 10/9/12- 16.2.2.1- Exchange for Complimentary Admissions

Charity Stripe, a women’s basketball student-athlete at Ocean State University, assigns all four of her complimentary admissions to a home event.  One of the recipients is the owner of a local salon where Charity gets her manicures and pedicures.  The owner of the salon is a big basketball fan and told Charity that if she could get tickets to the home games, she would give Charity a free manicure once a week.  Is this arrangement permissible?

  1.  Yes, as long as the value of the manicure is less than or equal to the value of the tickets
  2. Yes, as long as the owner of the salon is not an agent
  3. No, this arrangement would be considered a violation
  4. No, complimentary admissions may only be provided to immediate family members

The answer is 3NCAA Bylaw 16.2.2.1 states that a student-athlete may not receive payment from any source for his or her complimentary admissions and may not exchange or assign them for any item of value.