Daily Compliance Item- 10.17.16- 12.5.2.1- Student-Athlete Endorsement of Political Candidate

Several student-athletes at Ocean State University have been very enthusiastic about this year’s Presidential race. With all of the limitations pertaining to student-athletes’ endorsements, are these student-athletes permitted to endorse their preferred candidate?
Yes with conditions. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 12/30/87- Student-athlete endorsement of political candidate- states that enrolled student-athletes could be involved in the endorsement of a political candidate provided the student-athletes receive no remuneration for their involvement and are not obligated to make any time commitments; suggested that the following disclaimer be utilized in any press releases containing their names:

“The student-athletes are acting as citizens of the state, and do not necessarily represent the views of their institutions of higher education or the NCAA.”

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.14.16- 16.6.1.5- Snacks for Family Members

Flick is a field hockey student-athlete at Ocean State University (OSU). Flick’s birthday is this weekend, so the coaches would like to have snacks after the game on Saturday for the team and any family members that are in town for the game.
Is this permissible?

Yes. NCAA Bylaw 16.6.1.5 states that an institution may provide the family members of a student-athlete with reasonable food and drinks in conjunction with educational meetings or celebratory events (e.g., senior night) and on an occasional basis for other reasons. [R] (Adopted: 4/27/00 effective 8/1/00, Revised: 4/25/02 effective 8/1/02, 1/16/10, 1/19/13 effective 8/1/13, 8/7/14)

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.13.16- 17.3.2.1- Men’s Basketball Pre-Season Practice

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University (OSU) are planning out the pre-season schedule. A couple of the student-athletes have a lab during the scheduled practice time on thursday. If those student-athletes practice on a different day, will that day count against OSU’s 30 practice dates?
Yes. NCAA Bylaw 17.3.2.1 states that an institution shall not commence on-court preseason basketball practice sessions before the date that is 42 days before the date of the institution’s first regular-season contest. An institution shall not engage in more than 30 days of countable athletically related activities before its first regular-season contest. Any countable athletically related activities (e.g., conditioning, skill-related instruction) that occur within the 42-day period shall count against the 30 days of countable athletically related activities. (Revised: 4/28/05 effective 8/1/05, 1/14/08 effective 8/1/08, 5/2/13 effective 8/1/13, 1/15/14)
Please note the reference to “team” in the rationale of NCAA Proposal 2011-85. The NCAA has confirmed that the 30 designated practice days cannot apply to individual student-athletes.
The most recent modification to the first permissible contest date in men’s basketball reduced the number of preseason practice opportunities by up to seven days. This proposal allows the number of practice days in men’s basketball to remain at a maximum of 30, which is generally consistent with the number of practice opportunities permitted prior to the adoption of the current legislation. Additionally, this proposed flexible preseason practice schedule permits coaches to best use practice and off days to benefit student-athletes prior to the first contest. While the existing preseason practice schedule essentially dictates that practice must occur during every possible day, the flexible approach offered in this proposal provides each coach with the ability to determine when to use the practice opportunities depending on the team’s needs and the academic calendar. For example, a coach may provide the team with days off to study for midterm exams, to take advantage of fall vacation periods or to recover from injuries.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.12.16- 13.6.7.5- Student Host Money

The Ocean State University women’s soccer team hosted two prospective student-athletes last night on official visits. Several of the student-athletes on the team attended a Halloween party, so the recruits went with them. Everyone was supposed to wear a costume, so the student hosts took the recruits to the campus bookstore and bought them t-shirts with the student host money.

Was it a violation for the student hosts to use their host money to buy t-shirts to be used as Halloween costumes?

Yes. NCAA Bylaw 13.6.7.5 Student Host states that the student host must be either a current student-athlete or a student designated in a manner consistent with the institution’s policy for providing campus visits or tours to prospective students in general. The institution may provide the following to a student host entertaining a prospective student-athlete: [R] (Revised: 1/10/90 effective 8/1/90, 1/10/92, 1/9/96 effective 8/1/96, 10/28/97, 11/1/00, 8/5/04, 5/12/05, 4/27/06, 2/23/09, 4/26/12 effective 8/1/12, 6/16/15, 1/15/16 effective 8/1/16)

(a) A maximum of $40 for each day (24-hour period) of the visit (maximum of $80 for two 24-hour periods) to cover all actual costs of entertaining the student host(s) and the prospective student-athlete and up to four family members accompanying the prospective student-athlete, excluding the cost of meals and admission to campus athletics events. The cost of entertainment of the institution’s athletics department staff members who accompany the prospective student-athlete is also excluded. If an athletics department staff member serves as the prospective student-athlete’s host, his or her entertainment costs must be included in the entertainment allowance. The entertainment allowance may not be used for the purchase of souvenirs, such as T-shirts or other institutional mementos. It is permissible to provide the student host with an additional $20 per day for each additional prospective student-athlete the host entertains;

(b) Complimentary meals, provided the student host is accompanying the prospective student-athlete during the prospective student-athlete’s official visit; and

(c) Complimentary admissions to campus athletics events, provided the student host is accompanying the prospective student-athlete to the events during the prospective student-athlete’s official visit.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.11.16- 13.6.4.2- Extension of Official Visit

Intha Rough is a prospective student-athlete being recruited by the golf coaches at Ocean State University (OSU). Intha took an official visit to OSU’s campus this past weekend and was supposed to return home on Sunday. Because of Hurricane Matthew, Intha was unable to fly home until yesterday afternoon. Does OSU have to report a violation since Intha’s visit extended beyond the 48 hour limitation?

No. NCAA Bylaw 13.6.4.2 states that an official visit may extend beyond 48 hours for reasons beyond the control of the prospective student-athlete and the institution (e.g., inclement weather conditions, natural disaster, flight delays or cancellations, airport security activity). In such instances, the institution shall submit a report to the conference office noting the details of the circumstances. (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.7.16- Current Event

There are few easy fixes when hurricanes force schedule changes

USATODAY.com

For UMass athletics director Ryan Bamford, the week began with a signal from the skies. Early forecasts were showing that Hurricane Matthew might impact the football team’s trip to Old Dominion, and the last thing he wanted to do was have an entire football team stuck in the Norfolk area unable to get home.

“The last thing we wanted to do was sit there for three days,” Bamford told USA TODAY Sports.

Bamford was hardly alone among his colleagues this week, as athletics directors up and down the Eastern seaboard monitored Matthew’s track and the potential havoc it would wreak in Florida.

UMass, however, didn’t have a lot of options to reschedule the game and, as an independent, didn’t have a conference office to help smooth the process. Because the Minutemen end the season with a Nov. 19 game at BYU and then an immediate trip from there to Hawaii, where it will play Nov. 26, it didn’t make sense to fly back and play another road game the first weekend in December.

Essentially, the choices were to move the Old Dominion game to Friday before the weather is supposed to hit that area or just cancel it entirely.

But changing travel plans on short notice with an entire football team — even by a day — is more complicated than it sounds. It wasn’t until midday Wednesday, in fact, that UMass had secured a new charter airplane to transport the team on Thursday afternoon.

And that doesn’t even take into consideration rebooking hotel rooms for more than 100 people and dealing with charter buses and catered meals that all had to be moved up by a day.

“It hasn’t been easy,” Bamford said. “My staff has been working on it for the last 48 hours. The charter company had to source a plane from another area of the country to get here, and there’s an added cost to that we’re still trying to figure out.

“We’re thinking it’s going to be $35-$40,000, and ODU is going to help defray that cost so we obviously want to play the game and they want to play it, but biting off another $40,000 to get this moved within 48 hours was a lot to consider. Everything else worked well. The hotels were great, the bus company was great, rental cars, all that stuff worked well from the first call. We got that shifted, thank goodness, but the flight was the one literally took us two days.”

The complications involved with even slight changes to a scheduled football game help explain why the Southeastern Conference and Atlantic Coast Conference did not make final decisions regarding games in Miami, Gainesville, Fla., and Columbia, S.C. until late Thursday.

Florida-LSU scheduled for Saturday in Gainesville was postponed, and the SEC says it is looking for a reschedule date that works for both teams. Georgia at South Carolina was postponed until Sunday, time still to be determined.

One exception in the storm’s impact area was Tulane at UCF, which was scheduled for Friday night but canceled early Wednesday. The difference there was the teams had matching bye weeks on Nov. 5, making it a pretty easy call for UCF and the American Athletic Conference office.

Tulane athletics director Troy Dannen said several alternatives were considered including moving the game to New Orleans or finding a stadium somewhere in between to play the game. They also thought about playing it Saturday, but that would have required flying into the storm’s path on Friday.

In the end, though, moving it to November was the least messy solution.

“Without the matching bye dates, it would have been a much different process for us,” Dannen said. “We pretty much decided it wasn’t going to be played (on Tuesday night) but wanted to see if the models kept moving it west. When the models affirmed everything they’d been seeing that’s when the trigger got pulled.”

COACHING CAROUSEL CLIPS

Charlie Strong’s decision to demote Vance Bedford marked the second consecutive week in which a major program decided to change defensive coordinators midseason. The prior Sunday, Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly fired Brian VanGorder and elevated Greg Hudson, who already was on staff in an analyst position.

The Fighting Irish certainly didn’t look much better last Saturday against Syracuse, yielding 33 points and 489 total yards, and it remains to be seen how Strong taking control of Texas’ defense will affect the Longhorns on Saturday against Oklahoma.

But there’s no doubt head coaches are more apt these days to shake up their staffs during the season if the situation becomes desperate enough. Former Texas coach Mack Brown, now an ESPN analyst, made a similar move two games into 2013 season when he fired defensive coordinator Manny Diaz and replaced him with veteran college and pro coach Greg Robinson.

Though Brown has high regard for Diaz, who has totally rebuilt his reputation with strong defenses at Louisiana Tech, Mississippi State and currently Miami, it was the only way he could see for Texas to save its season — which it did, to some degree, by staying in the Big 12 title race until the final week.

“(Diaz) is a tremendous coach but it wasn’t working, and in modern-day football if it’s not working you have to try to fix it yourself or change it,” Brown told USA TODAY Sports. “And my feeling was that after two weeks and some tough games the year before, I felt like we needed to change it immediately. You also have to decide if you change it, is it going to be better? I happened to have Greg Robinson there who could help me, and I trusted him and (he) made it better and ended up having a chance to play for a conference championship against Baylor in the last game and Greg was a huge part of that.”

FAUX PAS OF THE WEEK

In the midst of a disappointing 3-2 start, Georgia Tech coach Paul Johnson went public this week with a complaint that has been simmering behind the scenes for the last several years. Asked about the strength of the ACC following Monday’s practice, Johnson talked about how this isn’t the same ACC of 20 years ago where there might just be one ranked team.

“For whatever reason, other schools have committed to it, they’re committed to having a good program,” Johnson told reporters.

But when someone followed up and asked if Georgia Tech’s commitment to winning football is going to be the first conversation he has with recently hired athletics director Todd Stansbury, Johnson went off the rails and sounded a bit whiny given that he’s only won three of his last 14 games against FBS opponents.

“Here’s what has to happen,” Johnson said. “No matter what you do, commitment has to meet expectations. You can’t have expectations with no commitment. It won’t work no matter what you do. So if you say you want to be on this level, you have to be committed to be on that level and you have to do what those people are doing. Simple as that.”

Asked if he felt he was getting that at Georgia Tech, Johnson shot back: “Compared to who? I don’t know that anybody gets that but I think you could ask that about anybody, but what I’m saying is…You guys look, you don’t have to ask me. Do you think we got the same thing Clemson does? So how can the expectation be to beat them?”

Johnson isn’t wrong. Georgia Tech doesn’t have the same resources as Clemson or Florida State, but it also doesn’t have as big of a fan base and deals with different academic requirements. Part of the reason Johnson has succeeded at Tech is because his triple-option system helps level the playing field. And for a decade, he’s won at a pretty high level even without the fanciest facilities or biggest administrative staff.

Now that his program is in a rut, it just sounds like an excuse, which his fan base isn’t in the mood to hear.

Remember Quinn Nordin, the kicker Jim Harbaugh wanted to sign so badly that he showed up at 12:01 a.m. on the first day of recruiting and slept over in his parents’ guest room? Well, Nordin has been injured this season but is apparently healthy now and ready to compete for the starting job.

Michigan’s kicking game has been one blotch on its otherwise terrific start this season, as its kickers have combined to make just four of nine field goals. Nordin returned to practice this week, and Harbaugh had an interesting quote about the ongoing kicker evaluation.

“We’re looking for someone to put their iron jock on and put the ball through the uprights,” Harbaugh said during his weekly 97.1-FM radio appearance, according to mlive.com.

DUD OF THE WEEK

Florida International was the first school this season to fire its coach, letting go of Ron Turner after starting 0-4. UTEP could very well be headed toward the same result, having lost four consecutive games by a combined score of 169-35. Simply put, these are two awful teams and rank as the two worst in all of FBS according to the Sagarin ratings. They play each other Saturday in El Paso, so congratulations if you’re a fan of either team and can actually sit through it. Otherwise, feel free to hide your eyes.

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.6.16- 17.1.7.4.2- Cancelled Competition and Required Day Off

The women’s soccer team at James River Institute has a home game tomorrow night. With Hurricane Matthew looming off the coast, there is a chance the game will not be completed and/or played at all. Both teams would like to play the game if possible. Which of the following is true regarding the required day off?

 

A. Regardless of whether the game is cancelled prior to the competition being considered a completed event, the student-athletes cannot use that day as a day off.

 

B. If the competition is cancelled after the teams have warmed up but prior to the start of the game, the student-athletes may count the day as a required day off as long as they do not participate in any further countable athletically related activities.

 

C. If the game is cancelled prior to the competition being considered a completed event, the student-athletes may use the day as their required day off as long as they do not participate in any further countable athletically related activities.

 

D. Both B and C

 

The answer is D. NCAA Bylaw 17.1.7.4.2 states that when an institution’s competition is canceled prior to the start of competition or canceled prior to the competition being considered a completed event in accordance with the playing rules of that sport, an institution may use that day as its required day off, provided the institution does not engage in any further countable athletically related activities during that day. (Adopted: 1/16/93)

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.5.16- 17.1.7.4- Required Day Off

The track and field coaches at Ocean State University are planning out the practice schedule for the remainder of the fall term. Because class schedules vary so much, some of the student-athletes are not able to practice at the same time or even on the same day. If the student-athletes are practicing on different days, is it permissible for them to serve the required day off on different days?

Yes. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 8/25/04- Required Days Off Apply Individually (I) states that the required day or days off per week (i.e., one per week during the playing sea¬son and two per week outside the playing season during the academic year) may apply individually to each student-athlete (as opposed to requiring the entire team to take the same day or days off per week). [References: Division I Bylaws 17.1.5.4 (required days off — playing season) and 17.1.5.5 (required days off — outside of the playing season) and a 3/24/93 staff interpretation, item b, which has been archived.]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.4.16- 15.2.6.3- Outside Financial Aid

Clay Court is a freshman tennis student-athlete at Ocean State University (OSU). Clay was selected to receive a $5000 scholarship for the 2016-17 academic year. When OSU researched the scholarship, it was determined that one of the criteria for the award is the recipient must attend OSU.

Is this a permissible source of financial aid for Clay to receive?

No. NCAA Bylaw 15.2.6.3 states that a student-athlete may receive financial aid through an established and continuing program to aid students, provided: (Adopted: 1/15/11 effective 8/1/11, Revised: 4/23/14)

(a) The recipient’s choice of institutions is not restricted by the donor of the aid;

(b) There is no direct connection between the donor and the student-athlete’s institution; and

(c) The financial aid is not provided by an outside sports team or organization that conducts a competitive sports program to an individual who is or has been a member of that team or organization.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.3.16- 14.4.3.5.4- Remedial Courses

Squib Kick is a freshman football student-athlete at Ocean State University (OSU). Squib is enrolled in 15 hours, 6 of which are remedial courses.
Which of the following is true?
A. OSU may include all six hours of remedial coursework when certifying Squib’s eligibility at the end of the term/year.
B. OSU is not permitted to use any remedial hours when certifying student-athletes’ eligibility.
C. Squib is only permitted to take remedial classes in the summer prior to initial full-time enrollment.
D. None of the Above.

The answer is A. NCAA Bylaw 14.4.3.5.4 states that remedial, tutorial or noncredit courses may be used by the student to satisfy the minimum academic progress requirement of Bylaw 14.4.3.1 only if they meet all of the following conditions: (Revised: 10/31/02 effective 8/1/03)
(a) The courses must be considered by the institution to be prerequisites for specific courses acceptable for any degree program;
(b) The courses must be given the same weight as others in the institution in determining the student’s status for full-time enrollment;
(c) Noncredit courses may not exceed the maximum institutional limit for such courses in any baccalaureate degree program (or the student’s specific baccalaureate degree program once a program has been designated); and
(d) Credit in such courses shall not exceed six-semester or nine-quarter hours, and the courses must be taken during the student’s first academic year of collegiate enrollment.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.