Daily Compliance Item- 10.31.16- 13.6.7.9, 13.7.3- Decorating Prospect’s Hotel Room

TRICK OR TREAT!

Ocean State University women’s tennis team has 3 prospects visiting campus today on official visits. The assistant coaches want to place Halloween decorations and candy all over the prospects’ hotel room. The Assistant Director of Compliance said this would be ok as long as the coaches do not include the prospects’ names in any of the decorations.

Is this a trick or treat?

IT’S A TRICK! Bylaw 13.6.7.9 (or 13.7.3 for unofficial visits) states that an institution may not arrange miscellaneous, personalized recruiting aids (e.g., personalized jerseys, personalized audio/video scoreboard presentations) and may not permit a prospective student-athlete to engage in any game-day simulations (e.g., running onto the field with the team during pregame introductions) during an official visit. Personalized recruiting aids include any decorative items and special additions to any location the prospective student-athlete will visit (e.g., hotel room, locker room, coach’s office, conference room, arena) regardless of whether the items include the prospective student-athlete’s name or picture. (Adopted: 8/5/04, Revised: 5/14/05)

There are several secondary violations posted on LSDBi regarding personalized recruiting aids.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.28.16- 13.4.1, 13.4.1.4- Questionnaires

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University are very interested in Dub L. Dribble, a prospective student-athlete that just began his sophomore year. Since Dub has not yet reached the permissible age to receive recruiting correspondence, is it permissible for the coaches to send him a questionnaire?

Yes with conditions. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 10/27/16- Questionnaires for Prospective Student-Athletes Prior to the Permissible Date to Receive Recruiting Materials (I)- states that the content of questionnaires is left to institutional discretion. However, prior to the first permissible date to receive recruiting materials, questionnaires may not include any recruiting language intended to solicit a prospective student-athlete’s enrollment, including general information about the institution’s athletics programs. An institution, may however, include images of institutional or athletic facilities without any accompanying descriptions at any time. Lastly, there is no restriction on the size of questionnaires; however, at no time may questionnaires include a detachable portion (e.g., poster, postcard).

[References: Bylaws: 13.4.1 (recruiting materials and electronic correspondence — general rule), 13.4.1.1 (exception — men’s basketball), 13.4.1.2 (exception — men’s ice hockey), 13.4.1.4 (printing recruiting materials); and 02/11/1987 staff interpretation (Item No. 2-5(2), 01/27/2016 official interpretation (Item No. 1)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.27.16- 14.4.3.5.5- Incomplete Grades

Will Linebacker is a football student-athlete at Ocean State University (OSU). Will took 2 courses this past summer but only completed 1 of them. Per institutional policy, he received an incomplete for the second course and is permitted to finish the work during the fall semester. If Will earns a grade for the summer course during the fall semester, can OSU count the 3 credits earned for that course toward fulfilling the 9 hour requirement that football student-athletes must earn in order to be eligible the subsequent fall term?

No. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 11/7/11- Incomplete Grades and Fulfillment of Credit-Hour Requirements (I)- states that when applying credit-hour requirements, a course taken during the summer but completed during the academic year must be counted during the summer and not during the academic year.

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 14.4.3.1 (fulfillment of credit-hour requirements), 14.4.3.1.4 (application of rule), 14.4.3.1.6 (additional requirements — football), 14.4.3.4.5 (incomplete grades) and a staff interpretation (2/28/96, Item No. a), which has been archived]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.26.16- 13.1.2.2, 13.1.5.8- Coach Attending NLI Signing Event

Men’s Basketball Coach at Ocean State University (OSU) has a daughter that is a senior in high school and is going to sign a National Letter of Intent (NLI) next month to play volleyball at another Division I institution. There are three other seniors at the daughter’s high school that will be signing NLIs to participate in various sports at the Division I level. This is the first year ever that this high school has had students sign NLIs, so the athletic director and principal want to conduct a small event for the families while the students sign their paperwork.

 
Is it permissible for the OSU coach to attend his daughter’s signing event?

 
Yes with conditions. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 2/27/08- Coach Who Is A Prospective Student-Athlete’s Parent or Legal Guardian Attending Letter-of-Intent-Signing (I/II)- states that a coach who is a prospective-student-athlete’s parent or legal guardian may attend and observe a letter-of-intent signing activity that involves the coach’s son or daughter (or individual for which the coach is a legal guardian) in addition to other prospective-student-athletes, provided the attendance does not involve any personal contact with any other prospective-student-athletes. [References: NCAA Divisions I and II Bylaws 13.1.2.2 (permissible recruiters-general exceptions), Division I Bylaw 13.1.6.7 (letter-of-intent signing), and Division II Bylaw 13.1.6.2 (letter-of-intent signing)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.25.16- 13.6.7.7- Meals In Transit to an Official Visit

Jump Ball is a prospective student-athlete who is being recruited to play basketball next year at Ocean State University (OSU). Jump is going to take an official visit to OSU’s campus this weekend. Jump will be leaving for the airport right after practice Friday evening and will not have an opportunity to eat dinner before traveling. Is it possible for OSU to stop along the way to campus so Jump can get some food to take to his hotel room?

Yes. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 10/5/16- Meals in Transit from the Airport and Lodging in the Locale Before an Official Visit Begins (I)- states that the following issues related to meals and lodging for prospective student-athletes and up to four family members accompanying the prospective student-athlete while in transit to an official visit have been confirmed:

(a) A prospective student-athlete and up to four family members accompanying the prospective student-athlete may receive a drive-thru or “to-go” meal while in transit with an athletics department staff member from the major airport or bus or train station nearest the institution without beginning the 48-hour official visit period.

(b) A prospective student-athlete and up to four family members accompanying the prospective student-athlete may receive a “sit-down” meal at the major airport or bus or train station nearest the institution while accompanied by an athletics department staff member at the time of arrival for an official visit or a “sit-down” or “drive-in” meal in route to the institution’s campus with an athletics department staff member, even if such a meal occurs outside a 30-mile radius of the institution’s campus; however, such a meal begins the 48-hour official visit period.

(c) A prospective student-athlete and up to four family members accompanying the prospective student-athlete may receive a meal at or in the vicinity of their place of lodging without beginning the 48-hour official visit period in instances in which they arrive in the locale of the institution too late to begin the official visit that day, provided no athletics department staff members or student-athletes are present during the meal.

[References: NCAA Bylaws 13.6.4.1 (48-hour period defined), 13.6.4.1.2 (lodging in locale of the institution before visit), 13.6.6 (accommodations on official visit), 13.6.7.7 (meals on official visit), and 13.6.6.1 (lodging for additional persons); official interpretations (10/19/12, Item Nos. 5 and 6), which have been archived]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 10.24.16- 12.5.1.1- Entertainment at Media Day

The men’s and women’s basketball student-athletes at James River Institute are attending their conference’s media day tomorrow in Washington, DC. The Conference office would like to provide a tour of some of the monuments in conjunction with media day. Is it permissible for these student-athletes to receive such entertainment expenses?

Yes. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 8/8/88- Student-athlete’s entertainment at a conference media day- states that a member conference would be permitted to provide expenses for entertainment activities (e.g., golf) for enrolled student-athletes for a conference media day, inasmuch as such activity is incidental to participation and provided the entertainment is not excessive in nature.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item 10.21.16- Current Event

Alabama’s medical tent is an idea popping up all over college football

USAToday.com

When Alabama played for the College Football Playoff title last season, its pop-up medical tent on the sideline was a matter of significant curiosity. There had never really been anything like it before in football, allowing an injured player to be examined privately without having to go back to the locker room.

The collapsible tent, which is attached to the base of a trainer’s table and then pulled over the top in a matter of seconds, was a fairly genius invention both in its practicality and design. And Jeff Allen, who conceived the project and debuted it last year as Alabama’s head football trainer and assistant athletics director for sports medicine, knew it would soon be in demand across football at all levels.

Along with two engineering students at Alabama who brought the idea to life, Allen has formed a company called Kinematic Sports to market and sell the “SidelinER” tent. Allen told USA TODAY Sports this week they’ve opened an office in Tuscaloosa and sold 45 tents to college football programs and another 10 to various customers including high schools and hospitals. According to the company’s Web site, a basic unit can be ordered for $5,000.

“It’s been amazing how this thing took off,” Allen said. “Even though I thought it was going to work, I’ll never forget the day I saw the prototype I was like, ‘Wow, this is going to work. I remember saying, once this thing get out there everybody is going to want one of these and that’s really the response that we’ve seen. We did not have to do a whole lot of marketing or advertising. It kind of took care of itself.”

Now Clemson has one, as does Ohio State, Louisville, Arkansas, Marshall, SMU, Troy, West Virginia, Northwestern, Ole Miss, Florida State and on and on and on. It probably won’t be long before nearly every FBS program has one, but it’s not simply a matter of trying to mimic Alabama.

Besides being easy to transport, the opportunity for a medical training staff to examine a player at a moment of distress and potential panic without 100,000 people peering in can be a valuable tool.

“It just makes so much sense in terms of protecting the privacy of the athlete, and the other thing I found medically is it changes the environment of trying to do an evaluation on an injured athlete without the distraction of the crowd,” Allen said. “I tell people the most critical time in evaluating is five-to-10 minutes after the injury, and to have that type of environment makes a difference. I notice a big difference in our athletes in there. They request it like, ‘let’s go.’ So it’s really been amazing.”

The success of this project could lead to more in the future. In June, Alabama’s board of trustees approved the Integrative Center for Athletic and Sport Technology (I-CAST), which connects athletics with people in engineering, kinesiology and sports medicine and will try to develop new technologies to benefit performance and injury recovery.

“It’s going to benefit our athletic department and the university,” Allen said. “It’s a great example of the collaboration that Alabama has between athletics and academics. It’s not the norm at a lot of places but we’re lucky here with the culture and climate the way it is.”

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Deputy Commissioner, NCAA Relations & Administration
Colonial Athletic Association

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION or JumpForward. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.