Daily Compliance Item- 3.30.16- 17.31.1.11- Transfers and Limits on Outside Teams

Spot Kick is a soccer student-athlete that will be transferring to Ocean State University (OSU) this fall. Spot is going to be playing on an outside team this summer instead of enrolling in summer school. If she participates on the same team as other current OSU student-athletes, does she count in the limitations on the number of student-athletes from OSU who may compete on this outside team? No. NCAA Bylaw 17.31.1.11– states that a student-athlete who has officially withdrawn from a four-year institution and has been accepted for enrollment at a second institution does not count in the limitation on the number of student-athletes from the first institution who may compete on an outside amateur team in the applicable sport and does not count in the limitation on the number of student-athletes at the second institution who may compete on an outside amateur team in the applicable sport unless he or she is a student-athlete at that institution (e.g., has enrolled and attended classes during a summer term). (Adopted: 4/15/14)

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 3.29.16- 13.12.1.5- Campus Tours During Camp/Clinic

The softball coaches at Ocean State University are working on their camp itineraries for this summer. There is still a little bit of free time on the first day, so the coaches would like to conduct campus wide tours. Is this permissible?

No. The coaches can only arrange for or provide a tour of the facilities that are utilized during the camp. NCAA Official Interpretation- 6/25/15- Campus Tours During Camps or Clinics (I)– states that it is not permissible for an institution’s athletics department to conduct a campus tour during an institutional sports camp or clinic. A prospective student-athlete may participate in a campus tour that is generally available to all prospective students, provided the athletics department is not involved in conducting or arranging the tour. In addition, the institution may conduct a tour of facilities that are utilized during the camp or clinic (e.g., residential hall, cafeteria, training room).

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaw 13.12.1.5 (recruiting calendar exceptions) and an official interpretation (3/13/15, Item No. 1), which has been archived]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 3.28.16- 15.2.8.1.2.3- Summer Athletic Aid

Slider is a full athletic scholarship baseball student-athlete at Ocean State University (OSU). Slider was also awarded an academic scholarship, so his athletic aid was reduced pursuant to NCAA financial aid limits. His equivalency against team limits is now 60%.

Slider is going to attend summer school and OSU would like to provide athletic aid to help with expenses. Which of the following is a true statement?

A. Slider may receive a 60% scholarship to attend summer school
B. Slider may receive a full scholarship to attend summer school
C. Slider may not receive any athletic aid to attend summer school
D. None of the above

The answer is B. NCAA Bylaw 15.2.8.1.2.3 states that if an institution provides a student-athlete with a full athletics grant during the academic year but is required to reduce the grant in accordance with Bylaw 15.1.4 (reduction when excess aid is awarded), the institution may provide the student-athlete full athletically related financial aid to attend the institution’s summer term.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 3.25.16- Current Event

Could North Carolina law cost state NCAA events?

USAToday.com

Could a new law in North Carolina relating to discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity result in NCAA championship events being taken away from the state?

Gov. Pat McCrory on Wednesday overturned Charlotte’s anti-discrimination ordinance, which was supposed to take effect April 1. The Republican-led General Assembly also stopped other cities and counties from passing protections based on sexual orientation and gender identity. And public schools must require bathrooms or locker rooms be designated for use only by people based on their biological sex.

It’s not immediately clear whether the NCAA will take action in this case, but it has stepped into such situations in the past.

Cities and towns around the state of North Carolina are scheduled to host at least 20 championship events in the next two-plus years, including the Division I men’s basketball tournament and the Division I Women’s College Cup soccer finals. First- and second-round games of the basketball tournament are set for Greensboro in 2017 and Charlotte in 2018. The soccer event is to be held in Cary, which has hosted numerous men’s and women’s finals in that sport.

Division I women’s basketball first- and second-round tournament sites are awarded annually, usually to the top 16 seeded teams. Similar arrangements are made for the sites of Division I baseball tournament regionals and super regionals. Teams from schools in the state often do well enough to host those events.

But Greensboro, Cary, Raleigh, Winston-Salem, Wingate and Conover already have been selected to host championship events in other Division I sports and/or Division II and Division III championships. For example, the eight-team, week-long Division II baseball championship is set for Cary this year and the next two.

The NCAA released a statement Thursday:

“We’ll continue to monitor current events, which include issues surrounding diversity, in all cities bidding on NCAA championships and events, as well as cities that have already been named as future host sites. Our commitment to the fair treatment of all individuals, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity, has not changed and is at the core of our NCAA values. It is our expectation that all people will be welcomed and treated with respect in cities that host our NCAA championships and events.”

The association in 2001 imposed a ban on holding championship events in South Carolina and Mississippi because Confederate battle flags flew at state capitols. The ban does not prevent schools from earning the right to host a regional event, as with postseason baseball and women’s basketball tournaments.

In 2005, the NCAA banned schools that had what it deemed to be hostile or abusive mascots from hosting championship events. That ban mostly targeted schools with Native American mascots.

Last year ahead of the Final Four in Indiana, the NCAA, which is headquartered in Indianapolis, expressed serious concerns about a religious freedom law that granted businesses the right to refuse service to gay and lesbian couples. The association was outspoken, and the law was repealed.

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 3.24.16- 17.1.5, 17.1.5.1- Mandatory Medical Exams

The athletic trainers at Ocean State University (OSU) would like to have all of the 2015-16 NLI signees undergo the required mandatory medical exams prior to arriving on OSU’s campus for summer school and/or preseason practice.

Can OSU pay the expenses associated with these exams?

Yes with conditions. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 3/23/16- Staff Interpretation

Expenses Related to Mandatory Medical Examination and Sickle Cell Solubility Test (I)– states that an institution may pay the cost of a mandatory medical exam or sickle cell solubility test for a prospective student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent or the institution’s written offer of admission and/or financial aid or after the institution has received his or her financial deposit in response to its offer of admission.
[References: NCAA Bylaws 13.02.12.1 (exception — after commitment), 13.2.1 (general regulation), 17.1.5 (mandatory medical examination) and 17.1.5.1 (sickle cell solubility test)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 3.23.16- Current Event

Big Ten’s Freshman Proposal Splits Universities

NYTimes.com

With three first-time champions in the last three years, Arizona State having completed its first season in Division I, and the highest graduation success rate among men’s major sports, it is poised for further growth.

But a proposal introduced by the Big Ten to lower the age limit of incoming freshmen by one year, to 20, has agitated the hockey community, pitting a number of traditional powers against many programs with small enrollments and smaller budgets.

“College hockey is very healthy right now, with a great product and great parity,” said Quinnipiac Coach Rand Pecknold, whose team is the No. 1 seed for the N.C.A.A. tournament, which begins Friday. “Why make a change for something that’s not broken?”

The legislation, which will be voted on by the 40-member Legislative Council at next month’s N.C.A.A. convention in San Antonio, was proposed in response to the rising average age of players, which was 21 years 9 months, in 2014-15. According to Brad Traviolia, the Big Ten’s deputy commissioner, more than two-thirds of the 2015-16 freshman class reached its 20th birthday before playing a college game.

Players currently are allowed to spend as many as three years past their high school graduation playing junior hockey before matriculating. (In most sports, athletes are allowed only a one-year grace period.) As a result, there are more 24- and even 25-year-olds playing against true freshmen, who are 18 and 19.

The proposed legislation would not rule out 21-year-old freshmen, but it would limit their eligibility to three seasons from four.

Traviolia said the proposal was also intended to encourage students to enter college at an earlier age and reduce their time until graduation.

The practice of using older players developed over the years as a means of competing against the sport’s leading programs. Teams like Michigan, Wisconsin, North Dakota, Boston College and Boston University have always attracted top recruits. This year, Michigan has 12 players on its roster who were drafted by the N.H.L., two of them in the first round.

To combat this, teams like Lake Superior State, which won three national championships between 1988 and 1994, began relying on players who, after playing a few years of junior hockey, were more skilled and physically developed.
These players also are on the rosters of the top programs, but to a lesser degree. The traditional powers continue to attract the best recruits, but many leave for the N.H.L. after three years, two years or even one year, as was the case with B.U.’s Jack Eichel, the second pick in the 2015 N.H.L. draft.

Coaches who are succeeding with older players argue that the Big Ten teams and others are intent on taking away one of their advantages in an age of college hockey parity.

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“I think this is a reaction by schools that are used to winning,” Holy Cross Coach David Berard said. “They want to have their cake and eat it, too.”

Among N.C.A.A. sports, hockey is sponsored by the fewest number of colleges and universities. Of the 60 colleges in Division I, 21 compete in Division II or III in other sports. That allows Union College, a private school of fewer than 2,500 students in Schenectady, N.Y., to beat Minnesota, a public university with an enrollment of more than 30,000, for the national championship, as it did two years ago.

“Why does the Big Ten want this?” asked Pecknold, whose captain, Soren Jonzzon, and star goalie, Michael Garteig, are both 24-year-old seniors. “To be honest, things are not going their way right now.”

Teams currently in the Big Ten have combined for 23 national titles, but the last was Michigan State’s in 2007, when the Spartans competed in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association. A six-team Big Ten hockey conference was formed for the 2013-14 season after Penn State joined Division I.

“For me, philosophically, I don’t think there should be 22-year-old freshmen,” Minnesota Coach Don Lucia, a leading proponent of the legislation, said in an interview with The College Hockey News. “It’s good for kids to be in college in closer proximity to the age of their peers.”

Hockey East contains a mix of traditional powers like Boston College and Boston University, which have won 10 national titles between them, and smaller programs like Massachusetts-Lowell, which reached the Frozen Four in 2013. Commissioner Joe Bertagna acknowledged that his league was split on the legislation, but Massachusetts-Lowell Coach Norm Bazin was adamant.

“I’m against the legislation, wholeheartedly,” he said. “We’re not a ‘name-brand’ school, so we have to work on developing the late-maturing kid. Limiting the player pool would be a big, big mistake.”

Also causing consternation was how the proposal was introduced. Typically, coaches and conference commissioners discuss issues surrounding the sport among themselves at their annual postseason convention in Naples, Fla. Consensus rules.

But as is its right as a so-called Power 5 conference, the Big Ten took the legislation directly to the N.C.A.A. in September, although coaches had voted, 49-11, against it in a straw poll, according to an article in The College Hockey News.

“People felt they were caught off guard by this,” said Josh Fenton, commissioner of the National Collegiate Hockey Conference, whose members include the seven-time champions North Dakota and Denver.

Arizona State, a member of the Pacific-12 in other sports, with one of the largest athletic budgets in the country, expects to be able to attract some of the nation’s elite players once its program matures. Yet Arizona State Coach Greg Powers said he would always be against the proposal.

“We will never be for this as long as I’m here,” he said. “We need to do what’s best for the entire body of college hockey.”

What’s best for hockey, many argue, is the status quo.

“If I were a betting man,” Bertagna said, “this legislation isn’t going to pass.”

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 3.22.16- 14.4.3.4- Certification of Eligibility at the End of the Academic Year

Bases Loaded is a baseball student-athlete at Ocean State University (OSU). Bases was eligible for competition for the fall 2015 semester but became ineligible for competition for the spring 2016 for not meeting the NCAA minimal GPA requirement. The baseball season extends beyond the last day of classes for OSU’s spring 2016 semester. If at the conclusion of the spring semester Bases is meeting all NCAA progress toward degree requirements, can he be re-certified and compete for the remainder of the season? Yes. NCAA Official Interpretation- 5/14/04- Certification of Eligibility at the End of the Academic Year- states that a student-athlete who was eligible for competition at the beginning of the academic year, but became ineligible at midyear, (e.g., due to failure to meet the six-hour requirement) could be certified as eligible at the end of the academic year for competition in a season already in progress (e.g., outdoor track and field, baseball) provided the student-athlete meets all applicable progress-toward-degree requirements to be eligible for competition during the subsequent fall term. [References: NCAA Bylaws 14.1.10 (change in eligibility status) and 14.4 (progress-toward-degree requirements); and a 4/27/89 official interpretation, Item No. 10]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.