Daily Compliance Item- 2.25.16- 12.5.2.1- Student-Athletes Providing Opinions on Products and Establishments

A few student-athletes were asked to participate in this month’s poll in the campus newspaper. The poll is “A few of my favorite things…” where students list their favorite restaurant, movie, candy, etc.
Is it permissible for the student-athletes to participate in this student poll since they will be asked to list commercial establishments?

Yes with conditions. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 2/20/15– Student-Athlete Providing Opinions on a Commercial Product or Service (I)- states that a student-athlete may provide an opinion about a commercial product or service, as long as no individual associated in any manner with the commercial product or service is involved in directing the student-athlete to issue the opinion, and the student-athlete does not receive any benefits from any source in conjunction with his or her opinion.

[References: NCAA Bylaw 12.5.2.1 (advertisements and promotions after becoming a student-athlete) and an official interpretation (10/06/94, Item No. 2, which has been archived)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 2.24.16- 13.1.7.15- Coaches’ Attendance at Junior Events

The Ocean State University Men’s Basketball coaches want to attend the Youth Olympic Games in April to evaluate a highly touted prospect. Since this is an elite international event, can the coaches attend even if it occurs outside of a contact or evaluation period?

No. NCAA Official Interpretation- 8/12/11- Coaches’ Attendance at International Junior Competition (I)– states that the legislation permitting coaches to attend elite international events (e.g., Olympic Games, World Championships) outside of a contact or evaluation period applies only to the events specified in the legislation and does not extend to junior level competition (e.g., Youth Olympic Games, Junior World Championships, U19 World University Games) that may be associated with the specified events.

[Reference: NCAA Division I Bylaw 13.1.7.19 (coaches’ attendance at elite international events) and a staff interpretation (5/16/11, Item No. b), which has been archived]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 2.23.16- 16.1.4- Memento to Student-Athlete for Career Achievements

Dee Up is a senior basketball student-athlete at Ocean State University (OSU). This weekend Dee has the opportunity to be the first female in OSU history to record 200 steals. When she reaches this milestone, the coaches would like to give Dee a game ball for her accomplishment. Is this permissible?

Yes. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 9/13/13– Recognition of Accomplishments in a Particular Contest or Event (I)- states that an institution may provide a memento of nominal value (e.g., game ball, t-shirt, hat, etc.), which may not include cash or cash equivalents, to a student-athlete in recognition of an accomplishment in a particular contest or event as a benefit incidental to participation.

[References: 16.1.4 (types of awards, awarding agencies, maximum value and numbers of awards) and a staff interpretation (11/27/96, item a), which has been archived]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 2.22.16- 16.1.4.3- Championship Awards

The Ocean State University women’s basketball team won the Ocean Eleven Conference tournament this year. The Conference office will be providing each member of the team with a championship gift. There are two student-athletes on the team that did not attend the tournament. One has been academically ineligible all year and the other is serving a year in residence for transferring.

Can the Conference office provide a gift to these two student-athletes?

No. NCAA Official Interpretation- 12/12/94- National or Conference Championship Awards to Ineligible Student-Athletes– states that it is not permissible for an institution or conference (or organization approved by either) to provide awards in recognition of conference or national championships to student-athletes who were not eligible to represent the institution in intercollegiate competition during the applicable sport season. [References: 16.1.4.3 (conference and national championships) and staff minute 12/07/88, item c]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 2.19.16- Current Event

Former Southeast Missouri State assistant coach committed rules violations

NCAA.org

A former Southeast Missouri State University assistant women’s basketball coach committed recruiting violations, according to a decision issued by a Division I Committee on Infractions panel.

This case was resolved through the summary disposition process, a cooperative effort where the involved parties collectively submit the case to the Committee on Infractions in written form. The NCAA enforcement staff, the university and involved individuals must agree to the facts and overall level of the case in order to utilize this process instead of a formal hearing.

The agreed-upon violations in this case centered on impermissible recruiting contacts and inducements involving two recruits, who were twin sisters, and their family. When recruiting the two sisters, the former assistant coach had multiple impermissible off-campus, in-person contacts with the prospects and their family. He had meetings with the recruits and their family during an evaluation and quiet periods, and at locations other than the recruits’ home or school, contrary to NCAA rules. Lastly, the former assistant coach had extensive off-campus contact with one of the recruits at a nonscholastic event during a dead period when contact with recruits is prohibited.

The former assistant coach also provided the recruits and their family with nearly $200 in school apparel and accessories at no cost. Further, the former assistant coach provided one of the recruits impermissible transportation and a meal.

A full list of penalties and corrective measures include:

•Public reprimand and censure for the university.
•One year of probation for the university from Feb. 12, 2016, through Feb. 11, 2017.
•A two-year show-cause order for the former assistant coach from Feb. 12, 2016, through Feb. 11, 2018. If he seeks employment at an NCAA member school, he must be restricted from all recruiting activity.
•A reduction in the number of days the women’s basketball coaches were allowed to recruit from 112 days to 74 in 2014-15. (Self-imposed by the university.)
•A reduction in the number of days the women’s basketball coaches can recruit from 112 days to 91 in 2015-16.
•A limit of eight official visits during 2015-16.
•A $5,000 fine.

Members of the Committee on Infractions are drawn from NCAA membership and members of the public. The members of the panel who reviewed this case are Greg Christopher, athletics director at Xavier University; Joel Maturi, former University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, athletics director; Eleanor W. Myers, law professor at Temple University; Joe Novak, former head football coach at Northern Illinois University; Jill Pilgrim, attorney in private practice; David Roberts, vice president for athletics compliance at the University of Southern California; and Greg Sankey, chief hearing officer, chair of the Committee on Infractions and commissioner of the Southeastern Conference.

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 2.18.16- 13.1.7.5.1- Regularly Scheduled Contests

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University (OSU) are looking to sign two more prospects during the late NLI signing period in April. One of the prospects they are recruiting, Point Guard, is participating in a game tomorrow evening. The game is a scrimmage against another high school team to help Point’s team prepare for the state post season tournament. This scrimmage was approved by the state high school scholastic association, and it is permissible for members of the general public to watch.

Since the scrimmage was not on the team’s schedule and it occurs after the conclusion of the regular season, is it permissible for the OSU coaches to be there to evaluate Point?

Yes with conditions. NCAA Educational Column- 2/17/16- Regularly Scheduled Contests/Tournaments (I)– provides further clarification on commonly asked questions pertaining to the definition of “regularly scheduled” contests.

Regularly Scheduled Contests/Tournaments.

When analyzing whether a high school, preparatory school or two-year college contest/tournament is regularly scheduled for evaluation purposes, the institution should consider the following factors:

1. Whether the teams participating in the contest are considered scholastic teams;

2. Whether the contest is permissible pursuant to the applicable scholastic governing body’s rules and regulations; and

3. Whether the contest is scheduled or organized at the request of the institution’s coach.

Note that a scrimmage or exhibition constitutes a contest for the purposes of evaluating live athletics activities.
Any questions regarding whether a team is considered scholastic or whether the contest is permissible pursuant to the scholastic governing body’s rules and regulations should be directed to the secondary institution or the appropriate scholastic governing body.

Factor No. 1 — Scholastic Team Determination.

•Per the Official Interpretation [Reference: 4/16/14], (determination of a scholastic team) the institution should determine whether at least one of the teams participating in the contest is considered a scholastic team. If neither team is considered a scholastic team, then the coach may not evaluate the contest regardless of whether it is considered regularly scheduled.

•For tournaments, contests should be analyzed on a contest-by-contest basis to determine whether the coach may evaluate.

Factor No. 2 — Scholastic Governing Body Rules and Regulations.

•The institution should determine whether the contest/tournament is scheduled in accordance with the applicable scholastic governing body’s rules and regulations.

•At least one of the teams participating in the contest must be considered a scholastic team and the contest must be scheduled in accordance with that team’s governing body’s rules and regulations. Further, for tournaments, each contest should be analyzed on a contest-by-contest basis to determine whether the coach may permissibly evaluate.

Factor No. 3 — Request to Schedule or Organize.

•If the institution’s coach requests a contest or a match-up to be scheduled, then the contest is not considered regularly scheduled even if Factor Nos. 1 and 2 are satisfied. If the institution’s coach requests a contest or a match-up, then the contest would constitute an impermissible tryout since it is being conducted on behalf of the institution’s coach.

Questions and Answers.

Question No. 1: Does the contest/tournament need to appear on the team schedules?

Answer No. 1: No. It is not a requirement that the contest/tournament appear on the team schedules for the contest/tournament to be considered regularly scheduled.

Question No. 2: Is the contest/tournament considered regularly scheduled if the contest/tournament appears on the team schedules?

Answer No. 2: No. Although it is more likely the contest/tournament is considered regularly scheduled if it appears on the team schedules, the determining factor is whether the contest/tournament is scheduled pursuant to the applicable scholastic governing body’s rules and regulations.

Question No. 3: Does the contest/tournament need to be regularly scheduled for both teams competing in the contest in order for the coach to evaluate?

Answer No. 3: No. The contest only needs to be regularly scheduled for one of the participating teams in addition to that team being considered scholastic.

Question No. 4: Is a contest/tournament considered regularly scheduled if the tournament organizer modifies the tournament schedule or match-ups in order to make it permissible for coaches to evaluate?

Answer No. 4: Yes. Provided the tournament organizer does not modify the schedule at the request of the institution’s coach.

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 13.1.7.4.5 (scholastic and nonscholastic activities –bowl subdivision football), 13.1.7.5.1 (academic year recruiting periods), 13.1.7.6.1 (academic year evaluation period), 13.11.1 (prohibited activities)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 2.16.16- 17.29- Eligibility for Foreign Tours

Ocean State University (OSU) men’s basketball team will be participating in a foreign tour this summer. Pick N. Roll, a student-athlete that will exhaust his eligibility at the conclusion of the academic year, would like to participate in the tour.

Is it permissible for Pick to participate in OSU’s foreign tour since he will have exhausted his eligibility prior to the start of the tour?

Yes with conditions. NCAA Educational Column- 2/15/16- Foreign Tours (I)– provides further clarification on many commonly asked questions surrounding foreign tours.

The following questions and answers are intended to assist the membership in applying NCAA Division I legislation as it relates to foreign tours.

Eligibility and Participation

Question No. 1: May a student-athlete participate in a foreign tour during the summer immediately after exhausting eligibility?

Answer No. 1: Yes, provided the student-athlete was eligible for intercollegiate competition during the previous academic year and has not professionalized himself/herself.

Question No. 2: May a continuing student-athlete who was not enrolled at the institution during the previous academic year participate on the institution’s foreign tour during the following summer?

Answer No. 2: Yes, provided the student-athlete was eligible for intercollegiate athletics in his or her most recent academic year of enrollment at the certifying institution.

For example, a student-athlete who was on an official religious mission during the 2015-16 academic year may participate on the institution’s foreign tour during summer 2016, provided he or she was eligible during his or her most recent academic year of enrollment at the institution.

Question No. 3: May a student-athlete participate in a foreign tour that occurs during the summer immediately following an academic year in which the student-athlete was ineligible during one term?

Answer No. 3: Yes. A student-athlete who is eligible for any term during the previous academic year at the certifying institution is eligible to compete in the institution’s foreign tour taken during the summer immediately following the same academic year.

For example, if a student-athlete is eligible during the fall 2015 term at the certifying institution, but not eligible during the spring 2016 term, the student-athlete would be eligible to compete in the institution’s foreign tour that occurs summer 2016.

Question No. 4: May a midyear transfer who is ineligible for competition at the certifying institution participate in the institution’s foreign tour that occurs during the summer of the student-athlete’s year in residence?

Answer No. 4: No. A midyear enrollee serving a year of residence is not eligible for the institution’s foreign tour that occurs in the summer inasmuch as the student-athlete was neither eligible at the certifying institution during the previous academic year nor eligible for competition for the fall term following the foreign tour. This analysis would apply even if the student-athlete was ineligible due to a conference rule.

Question No. 5: May a student-athlete depart for an institution’s foreign tour prior to all of the student-athlete’s final grades posting for the summer term preceding the foreign tour?

Answer No. 5: Yes. It is not necessary that all of the student-athletes’ grades be posted, provided the institution can certify that the student-athlete will be academically eligible for the fall term immediately following the summer foreign tour (e.g., meets all progress-toward-degree-requirements) based on the grades that are posted.

Question No. 6: May a student-athlete who is eligible during the fall term but not eligible during the spring term of the same academic year represent the institution in a foreign tour during the spring term?

Answer No. 6: No. Since the student-athlete is not eligible to represent the institution in any intercollegiate competition during the spring term, he or she is not eligible for a foreign tour that occurs during that term.

Question No. 7: How does the “prohibition prior to the championship segment” legislation apply to sports in which separate dates are specified for the first permissible date of practice and the first permissible date of competition for the championship segment?

Answer No. 7: An institution may not depart for a foreign tour during the following period: 30 days prior to the first date of practice or until the first date of competition or contest in the championship segment. This prohibition includes travel days. The intent of this legislation is to prohibit teams from gaining additional preseason practice time by scheduling a foreign tour prior to the championship segment.

Question No. 8: How does the “prohibition prior to the championship segment” legislation apply to sports in which the same date is specified for the first permissible date of practice and first permissible date of competition?

Answer No. 8: An institution may not engage in a foreign tour for a period of 30 days prior to the first day of the institution’s declared playing and practice season.

Question No. 9: If an institution participates in an event that meets the legislation to be a qualifying regular season multiple-team event, would the team’s participation in the event also count as its once-every-four years in-season foreign competition?

Answer No. 9: No. Further, participation in either a permissible qualifying regular season multiple team event or an in-season foreign competition does not preclude an institution from participating in an institutionally certified foreign tour once in four years, provided all other elements of the foreign tour legislation are met.

Question No. 10: In basketball, is a graduate transfer student-athlete required to satisfy the first prong of the basketball exception for foreign tour eligibility of incoming student-athletes by earning three hours of acceptable degree credit during the summer term prior to participating in a foreign tour and practice for the tour?

Answer No. 10: No. The graduate transfer student-athlete must only have graduated from the previous institution, have evidenced his or her commitment to applicant institution, have been accepted for enrollment in a graduate program at applicant institution, and have satisfied the second prong of the exception requiring the student-athlete to be eligible to represent the institution in intercollegiate athletics during the academic year following the tour.
The graduate transfer student-athlete may evidence his or her commitment to applicant institution by signing an institution’s written offer of admission and/or financial aid or by submitting a financial aid deposit in response to the institution’s offer of admission.

Question No. 11: May a transfer student-athlete in basketball participate in more than one institutional foreign tour?

Answer No. 11: A student-athlete may not participate in more than one foreign tour for a specific institution; however, the student-athlete is not precluded from participating in a foreign tour for a second institution as long as he or she meets all of the other applicable eligibility requirements for the tour.

Practices

Question No. 12: May a student-athlete, who is serving a year of residence or is otherwise ineligible to compete in the foreign tour, participate in practices associated with the foreign tour?

Answer No. 12: No, such a student-athlete is not eligible for practice associated with the foreign tour because he or she is not eligible to participate in the tour.

Question No. 13: May an ineligible student-athlete observe practice for the institution’s foreign tour?

Answer No. 13: Yes, provided the practices are open to the general public and the student-athlete does not participate in any team activities.

Question No. 14: Are student-athletes participating in permissible practice activities prior to a foreign tour subject to countable athletically related activities limitations (i.e., four hours/day, 20 hours/ week, required day off)?

Answer No. 14: No. There are no daily or weekly hour limitations when student-athletes are participating during the 10 days of practice in preparation for competition in the foreign tour, provided the day occurs during an institutional vacation period.

Question No. 15: May an institution publicize practices associated with a foreign tour?

Answer No. 15: Yes.

Outside-Team Tours

Question No. 16: May a student-athlete serving a year of residence participate on an outside-team foreign tour if he or she is ineligible to compete on an institution’s foreign tour?

Answer No. 16: Yes. A student-athlete serving a year of residence at an institution may participate in an outside team tour regardless of whether he or she meets the eligibility requirements to participate in an institution’s foreign tour, provided the number of student-athletes participating on the outside team from the same member institution does not exceed the limitations set forth in the outside-team tours legislation. If the number of student-athletes participating on the outside team tour is more than the limitations in the outside-team tours legislation, the outside-team tour must be certified by the institution and the student-athletes must meet eligibility requirements as noted in the legislation.

Question No. 17: May an institution’s coach be a coach of an outside team participating in a foreign tour that includes student-athletes from the institution’s roster?

Answer No. 17: Yes.

Question No. 18: May an institution’s noncoaching staff member with sport-specific responsibilities participate in an outside foreign tour as a noncoaching staff member for a team that includes current student-athletes from the institution?

Answer No. 18: Yes; however, the noncoaching staff member with sport-specific responsibilities may not participate in coaching activities and may not participate with or observing student-athletes in the staff member’s sport who are engaged in nonorganized voluntary athletically related activities.
Expenses

Question No. 19: May an outside sponsor provide expenses to a student-athlete participating in an outside foreign tour?

Answer No. 19: Yes. An outside sponsor may provide actual and necessary expenses for a student-athlete to participate in outside competition, as long as the outside sponsor is not an agent, representative of the institution’s athletics interests, or a professional sports organization.

Question No. 20: May an institution or booster be involved in fundraising for a student-athlete participating in an outside tour?

Answer No. 20: No. Neither an institution nor a booster may have any involvement in fundraising for a student-athlete or outside team foreign tour. In addition, neither may arrange for a student-athlete’s financial sponsorship from an outside source because it would trigger extra benefit legislation. However, it is permissible for a representative of the institution’s athletics interests to donate to an outside team, provided the representative acts independently of the institution, the funds are distributed through channels established by the organization conducting the fundraising activity and the funds are not earmarked directly for a specific student-athlete.

Question No. 21: For outside-team tours, may an outside sponsor provide a student-athlete expenses through fundraising activities that are made on behalf of or earmarked for the student-athlete?

Answer No. 21: Yes. An outside sponsor may provide a student-athlete, who is a member of a team or who participates in a sport as an individual, actual and necessary expenses for competition and practice held in preparation for that competition, provided the sponsor is not an agent or representative of an institution’s athletics interests.

Question No. 22: May an institution provide a student-athlete expenses to return home or to a destination other than campus at the conclusion of a foreign tour?

Answer No. 22: Yes. An institution may provide actual and necessary expenses to a student-athlete to represent the institution in practice and competition, including travel expenses incidental to practice or competition. This provides member institutions flexibility when determining which travel expenses may be reasonably considered incidental to practice or competition, including expenses for student-athletes who do not travel with the team to or from competition during vacations periods (e.g., travel from the competition site to home prior to returning to campus) and travel to the institution for purposes of engaging in required practice activities after the student-athlete’s initial arrival on campus for the academic year.

Question No. 23: May an institution provide entertainment to eligible student-athletes, who will be participating on the foreign tour while on campus for practices for the foreign tour and during the foreign tour?

Question No. 23: Yes. For purposes of entertainment in conjunction with practice in preparation for the foreign tour competition, the foreign tour is considered “in season.” Therefore, it is permissible to provide entertainment to student-athletes prior to the foreign tour (while on-campus) and during the foreign tour.

Question No. 24: May a student-athlete be involved in institutional fundraising activities for the institution’s foreign tour?

Answer No. 24: Yes. An institution or recognized entity of the institution, conference, or noninstitutional charitable, educational or nonprofit agency may use a student-athlete’s name, picture of appearance to support its charitable or educational activities or to support activities considered incidental to the student-athlete’s participation in intercollegiate athletics, provided the conditions for permissible promotional activities for institutional, charitable, education or nonprofit promotions legislation are met.

Question No. 25: May an institution pay to acquire copies of a student-athlete’s birth certificate or visa, provided the birth certificates and visas are credentials required for travel in connection with a foreign tour?

Answer No. 25: Yes.

Question No. 26: May an institution purchase passports for incoming student-athletes who are required for travel with a foreign tour?

Answer No. 26: Yes; however, ideally the incoming or prospective-student athlete would pay for the passport, and once he or she triggers student-athlete status, the institution would reimburse the student-athlete. If the institution pays up front for the incoming student’s passport, it risks a violation if the incoming student never enrolls or is deemed ineligible for the foreign tour.

Question No. 27: May an institution purchase passports for continuing student-athletes who are required for travel with a foreign tour?

Answer No. 27: Yes. An institution may purchase passports for its student-athletes who are required for travel in connection with a foreign tour, and student-athletes may retain ownership of such passports. The institution also may provide student-athletes with reasonable local transportation to obtain such passports.

[References: Bylaws 11.7.1.1 (countable coach), 11.7.3 (noncoaching staff member with sport-specific responsibilities), 12.02.1 (agent), 12.1.2.1.4.3 (expenses from an outside sponsor), 12.3.1.2 (benefits from prospective agents), 15.01.6.1 (student assistance funds), 16.02.3 (extra benefit), 16.5.2 (permissible — housing and meals), 16.7 (entertainment in conjunction with practice or competition), 16.8.1 (permissible — expenses for practice and competition), 16.8.1.2 (other competition), 16.9.1 (permissible travel expenses not related to practice or competition), 16.11.1.8 (student assistance funds), 17.1.7.1 (daily and weekly hour limitations — playing season), 17.1.7.2.1.5.1 (basketball), 17.1.7.2.2 (skill instruction — sports other than baseball and football), 17.1.7.3.6 (vacation periods and between terms), 17.3.5.1.1 (qualifying regular-season multiple-team event), 17.3.5.1.2 (in-season foreign competition), 17.3.8.3 (involvement of coaching staff), 17.29 (foreign tours), 17.29.1.2.2 (prohibition prior to championship segment), 17.29.1.3 (time lapse between tours), 17.29.1.4.1.1 (exception — basketball), 17.29.1.4.1.1.1 (exception for practice prior to departure — basketball), 17.29.1.5 (practice limitation), 17.29.1.10 (passports), 17.29.2 (outside-team tours), 17.31.4 (exceptions — basketball), staff interpretation (12/12/2014, Item No. a), staff interpretation (8/22/2014, Item No. a), staff interpretation (5/15/2014, Item No. c), staff interpretation (2/28/2014, Item No. d), staff interpretation (9/27/2013, Item No. d), staff interpretation (1/28/2011, Item No. a), staff interpretation (8/11/1995, Item No. c)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.