Daily Compliance Item- 11.30.15- 14.4.3.4.2- Eligibility for Postseason Bowl Game

TRUE OR FALSE????

Football student-athletes participating in a postseason bowl game must complete 6 hours of academic credit regardless of whether the bowl game takes place during the holiday break or during the institution’s next regular academic term (e.g., spring semester).

This is true. NCAA Bylaw 14.4.3.4.2 states that to be eligible to compete in a postseason event (e.g., conference tournament, bowl game, National Invitation Tournament, NCAA championship) that occurs between regular terms (including summer) a student-athlete shall have satisfactorily completed six semester or six quarter hours of academic credit during the preceding regular academic term of full-time enrollment (see Bylaw 14.4.3.1). (Adopted: 4/28/05 effective 8/1/05, Revised: 12/12/06, 1/8/07 effective 8/1/07, 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07, 7/31/14)

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

Daily Compliance Item- 11.25.15- 13.6.7.5- Student Host During Vacation Period

Ocean State University (OSU) men’s ice hockey coaches would like to provide Zam Boni, a senior prospect, with an an official visit. The only time Zam is able to visit campus is during OSU’s vacation period next month. One of the current student-athletes volunteered to be the host, but he lives in the dorm which closes prior to Zam’s visit.

Since the dorm is closed, the coaches would like the host to stay in the hotel room with Zam. Is this permissible?

No. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 4/13/94- Student Host Staying in Hotel Room With Prospect– states that an institution, at its discretion, may allow a student host to stay in the prospective student-athlete’s hotel room during an official visit, provided the official visit does not occur during avacation period.

[References: NCAA Bylaw 13.7.5.5 (student host), and 12/20/91 staff minutes, item 1-b]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 11.24.15- 17.1.7.3.6- CARA Time Limits During an Institution’s Interim Term

True or False??

If a student-athlete enrolls in classes during an optional interim term (e.g., mini term) during the institution’s official vacation period at the conclusion of the fall semester, he/she is subject to the daily and/or weekly hour limitations.

FALSE. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 5/31/91- Time limits for athletically related activities during member institution’s mini-term- states that the daily and weekly hour limitations do not apply to countable athletics related activities during a member institution’s mini term (e.g., “4-1-4”) that is not mandatory.

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 11.19.15- 14.5.5.5- Midyear Transfer in the Sport of Basketball/Baseball

Topoftha Key is currently a basketball student-athlete at Bay State College. Topoftha will be transferring and enrolling at Ocean State University (OSU) this January. Due to the extenuating circumstances surrounding the transfer, Topoftha qualifies for an exception to the one year residence requirement.

Since Topoftha is permitted to compete in January with the waiver and assuming he meets all NCAA PTD requirements, can he compete for OSU starting in the spring 2016 semester?

No. NCAA Bylaw 14.5.5.5 states that in baseball and basketball, a student-athlete who initially enrolls at the certifying institution as a full-time student after the conclusion of the first term of the academic year and qualifies for an exception to the one-year residence requirement shall not be eligible for competition until the ensuing academic year. (Adopted: 6/24/09)

Would the answer be different if Topoftha graduated from Bay State College in December and transferred to OSU as a graduate student?

No. NCAA Official Interpretation- Baseball or Basketball Midyear Graduate Transfer (I)– states that, in baseball and basketball, a graduate student-athlete who qualifies for the one-time transfer exception but initially enrolls as a full-time student at the certifying institution after the first term of the academic year shall not be eligible for competition until the ensuing academic year.

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 14.1.8.1 (one-time transfer exception), 14.5.5.3 (competition in year of transfer) and 14.5.5.5 (baseball and basketball — midyear enrollee) and a 9/21/12 staff interpretation, Item No. a, which has been archvived]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 11.18.15- 16.6.1.2- Discounted Lodging for Parents at Postseason Events

Ocean State University (OSU) women’s soccer team is participating in the second round of the NCAA tournament this weekend. A lot of parents are traveling to the game and asked if OSU can help secure rooms for them at the same discounted price that the team is receiving.

Is is permissible for OSU to secure rooms for student-athletes’ family members at a discounted price?

Yes. NCAA Bylaw 16.6.1.2 states that an institution may reserve or secure lodging at any postseason event (other than a conference event) at a reduced or special rate for the family members of a student-athlete who is a participant. It is not permissible for an institution to cover any portion of the cost of lodging, including any cost associated with reserving or securing lodging. [R] (Adopted: 10/28/99, Revised: 1/19/13 effective 8/1/13, 8/7/14)

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.

Daily Compliance Item- 11.17.15- 11.1.5- Noncertified Strength and Conditioning Coaches

Ocean State University recently hired 2 new strength and conditioning coaches. These individuals graduated this past year but have not yet been certified. Which of the following activities can they perform prior to earning their certification?

A. Develop and direct specific workouts for student-athletes.

B. Assist with the development and direction of workouts for student-athletes.

C. Perform various administrative or clerical duties.

D. All of the above.

The answer is C. NCAA Educational Column- 7/31/14- Proposal No. 2013-18 Athletics Personnel — Conduct of Athletics Personnel — Strength and Conditioning Coaches — Nationally Recognized Certification (I)– further clarifies the legislation surrounding the certification requirement for strength and conditioning coaches. Editor’s Note: Question No. 4 of this educational column was added November 11, 2015, to provide additional clarification regarding the involvement of a noncertified strength and conditioning coach with strength and conditioning activities. Question No. 5 (now Question No. 6) of this educational column was updated March 27, 2015 and May 8, 2015 to provide additional clarification in order to avoid membership confusion. Question Nos. 4 and 5 (now Question Nos. 5 and 6) were updated on July 16, 2015, based on guidance from the Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports. The original posting date was kept for ease of reference and to maintain a date link with other Q&A transitioned educational columns for proposals adopted at the same time.

This document contains questions and answers to assist the NCAA membership in its understanding of legislation related to strength and conditioning certification as adopted by Proposal No. 2013-18 (nationally accredited certification of strength and conditioning coaches).

Question No. 1: Is a sport coach (e.g., head or assistant basketball coach) required to maintain strength and conditioning coach certification?

Answer: No.

Question No. 2: May an institution pay for the nationally accredited certification program?

Answer: Yes.

Question No. 3: May strength and conditioning interns or graduate students conduct strength or conditioning programs for student-athletes without receiving strength and conditioning coach certification?

Answer: It is permissible for a strength and conditioning intern or graduate student who is not certified to perform the duties of strength and conditioning coach, provided he or she is under the direct supervision of a certified strength and conditioning coach who is present during the performance of such duties.

Question No. 4: May a noncertified strength and conditioning coach be involved with strength and conditioning activities in which student-athletes participate?

Answer: No. It is not permissible for a noncertified strength and conditioning coach to engage in any type of strength and conditioning activity, including, but not limited to, the design, development, conduct or monitoring of strength and conditioning activities in which student-athletes participate. Further, a noncertified strength and conditioning coach may not assist in the design, development, conduct or monitoring of strength and conditioning activities in which student-athletes participate under the supervision of a certified strength and conditioning coach (other than strength and conditioning interns or graduate students). A noncertified strength and conditioning coach is permitted to be present while a certified strength and conditioning coach conducts or monitors activities in which student-athletes participate. Institutions have the discretion to determine whether noncertified strength and conditioning coaches may perform administrative or clerical duties.

Question No. 5: What should an institution consider when evaluating strength and conditioning certifications?

Answer: It is the responsibility of the institution to determine what nationally accredited strength and conditioning certification programs best meet institutional needs. The following is guidance that institutions may use when evaluating strength and conditioning certifications:

a. Consider whether completion of the certification program results in the provision of a strength and conditioning credential that is accredited. Accreditation of the certification exam and/or credential is different from accreditation of the educational component of a strength and conditioning program;

b. Consider the minimal professional educational standards and continuing education requirements required by the certification program;

c. Consider whether the certification also requires current CPR and AED certification; and

d. Consider whether the certification requires a baccalaureate degree or higher.

Question No. 6: Should outside fitness instructors (e.g., yoga, Pilates, zumba, crossfit, etc.) receive strength and conditioning coach certification in order to conduct strength and conditioning activities with student-athletes?

Answer: While the legislation does not require outside fitness instructors to have strength and conditioning coach certification, institutions should evaluate whether strength and conditioning certification is appropriate for any individual who conducts strength and conditioning activities for student-athletes, including, but not limited to, outside fitness instructors.

Finally, institutions should note that a strength and conditioning coach who conducts voluntary weight-training or conditioning activities with prospective student-athletes or enrolled student-athletes is required to maintain certification in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 11.1 (conduct of athletics personnel), 11.1.5 (strength and conditioning certification, 13.11.3.7.4 (strength and conditioning coach first aid/CPR certification and authority of sports medicine staff FBS/FCS), 13.11.3.8.2 (strength and conditioning coach first aid/CPR certification and authority of sports medicine staff), 17.1.7.2.1.4 (strength and conditioning coach first aid/CPR certification and authority of sports medicine staff — sports other than football), 17.10.6.3 (strength and conditioning coach first aid/CPR certification and authority of sports medicine staff FBS/FCS)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

Daily Compliance Item- 11.16.15- 15.2.6.3- Permissible Outside Sources of Financial Aid

Back Spin is a men’s tennis student-athlete at Ocean State University. Back is receiving a 50% athletic scholarship for the 2015-16 academic year. Recently, Back was notified that he is the recipient of a Civitan Club scholarship from his home town. The scholarship is completely unrelated to athletics but in order to receive it the recipient must attend Ocean State University.

Since the Civitan Club scholarship is unrelated to athletics, can Back accept it?

No. NCAA Educational Column- 11/5/14- Financial Aid from an Established and Continuing Program — Financial Aid from an Outside Sports Team or Organization (I)– provides further clarification on permissible outside financial aid sources. Editor’s Note: The General Section, Subsection A, and Subsection B of this educational column was updated November 16, 2015, to provide additional clarification in order to avoid membership confusion. The original posting date was kept for ease of reference and to maintain a date link with other Q&A transitioned educational columns for proposals adopted at the same time.

Division I member institutions are reminded that with the adoption of Proposal No. 2010-69-B, a student-athlete may receive financial aid through an established and continuing program to aid students, provided:

(a) The recipient’s choice of institutions is not restricted by the donor of the aid;

(b) There is no direct connection between the donor and the student-athlete’s institution; and

(c) The financial aid is not provided by an outside sports team or organization that conducts a competitive sports program to an individual who is or has been a member of that team or organization.

The following scenarios are intended to assist the membership in consistently applying the legislation. For purposes of these scenarios, it is assumed the other provisions of Bylaw 15.2.6.3 are met.

General

Scenario No. 1: Student-athlete received a scholarship from a high school booster club for athletic achievement.

Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid, even if athletics is a criterion for the scholarship.

Scenario No. 2: Student-athlete received a scholarship that does not meet the criteria of financial aid from an established and continuing program.

Application: The student-athlete may not receive the aid, even if the institution was planning to count the aid in the team limits; unless, it is permissible under another provision of the legislation.

Scenario No. 3: Student-athlete received a scholarship that meets the criteria of financial aid from an established and continuing program; however, the scholarship is in its first year.

Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid, if it is the intent of the scholarship to continue in future years.
Subsection A

Scenario No. 1: Student-athlete received a scholarship from a local elementary school that requires the recipient to be an elementary education major at a collegiate institution.

Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid.

Scenario No. 2: Student-athlete received a scholarship from a rotary club that requires the recipient to enroll at a college or university within the state.

Application: The student-athlete may not receive the aid. The student-athlete’s choice of institution is being restricted by the donor.

Scenario No. 3: Student-athlete received a scholarship from a local high school booster club that requires the recipient to enroll at an NCAA or NAIA college or university.

Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid.

Subsection B

Scenario No. 1: Student-athlete received a scholarship from a donor who is an alumnus of the student-athlete’s institution.

Application: The student-athlete may not receive the aid since there is a direct connection between the donor and the institution.

Scenario No. 2: Student-athlete received a scholarship from a donor who is a parent of a current student-athlete at the institution but is not an alumnus.

Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid since there is no a direct connection between the donor and the institution.

Subsection C

Scenario No. 1: Student-athlete received a scholarship from the high school baseball booster club, which provides a scholarship each year to one outstanding graduating senior on the baseball team.

Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid. The high school booster club is not an outside sport team or outside organization that conducts an athletics program. And, although the recipient represents the high school team, he or she has not represented the booster club in competition.

Scenario No. 2: Student-athlete received a scholarship the high school provides each year to one outstanding graduating senior athlete.

Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid. The high school is not an outside sport team or outside organization that conducts an athletics program.

Scenario No. 3: Student-athlete received an honor scholarship from the high school athletics association. Each year, the high school athletics association provides this scholarship to one graduating senior who participates in the state tournament. The student-athlete participates in a state vs. state all-star tournament subsequent to the state tournament.

Application: The student-athlete may not receive the aid. The high school athletics association is an outside organization that conducts an athletics program and the recipient represented the high school athletics association in competition as a member of a team it organized.

Scenario No. 4: Student-athlete received a memorial scholarship from an area golf association provided to a graduating high school senior who best exemplifies the qualities of the individual for whom the scholarship is named. In order to participate in junior golf competitions in the area individuals must be a member of the association.

Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid if he or she has only represented himself or herself or a team other than one representing the area golf association in competition. If the student-athlete has represented the area golf association in competition, then it is not permissible for him or her to receive the scholarship.

Scenario No. 5: Student-athlete received a scholarship from the local football league based on community service, leadership and academics. Only graduating high school seniors who participated on a Pop Warner team sponsored by the league are eligible for consideration.

Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid only if he or she has never represented the local football league in competition (e.g., as a member of a league all-star team vs. other league all-star teams). If the student-athlete has represented the local football league in competition, then it is not permissible for him or her to receive the scholarship.

Scenario No. 6: Student-athlete received a scholarship provided yearly to a graduating high school senior by the local swimming committee. The student-athlete represented the local swimming committee during one zone competition against other local swimming committees two years prior.

Application: The student-athlete represented the awarding organization in competition as a member of a team it organized. Therefore, the student-athlete is not permitted to receive the aid.

[References: NCAA Bylaws 12.1.2.1.3.2 (educational expenses from outside sports team or organization — after collegiate enrollment) and 15.2.6.3 (financial aid from an established and continuing program)]

Jennifer M. Condaras
Associate Commissioner
BIG EAST Conference

The opinions expressed in the Daily Compliance Item are the author’s and the author’s alone, and are not endorsed by The BIG EAST Conference, JumpForward, or the Collegiate Sports Group of Bond, Schoeneck, and King. The Daily Compliance Item is not a substitute for a compliance office, case specific research, or the NCAA Bylaws. Do some homework, ask around, and get it right.