Daily Compliance Item- 11/12/14- 16.02.4, 16.6.1.6- Institutional Sports Banquet

Ocean State University (OSU) is conducting its annual cross country banquet at the end of the month.  Kilo Meter, a sophomore student-athlete on the team, achieved First Team All-America honors this year, so her parents and two siblings would like to attend the banquet.  Is it permissible for OSU to provide complimentary admissions to Kilo’s family members?
Yes.  NCAA Bylaw 16.6.1.6 states that sn institution may provide complimentary admissions to an institutional awards banquet for the family members of any student-athlete being honored at the banquet. [R] (Adopted: 11/1/00, Revised: 1/19/13 effective 8/1/13)
As a reminder, Bylaw 16.02.4 states that for purposes of Bylaw 16, a family member is an individual with any of the following relationships to a student-athlete: spouse, parent or legal guardian, child, sibling, grandparent, domestic partner or any individual whose close association with the student-athlete is the practical equivalent of a family relationship. (Adopted: 1/19/13 effective 8/1/13)

Daily Compliance Item- 11/11/14- 11.6.1.2- Scouting at NCAA Championships

The women’s soccer coaches at Ocean State University (OSU) would like to go watch a first round game in the NCAA soccer tournament.  An institution in the area is hosting a team that OSU will be playing this spring during the non-championship segment.    Is it permissible for the OSU coaches to attend the NCAA tournament game since they will be playing one of the teams in the spring?  
Yes.  NCAA Bylaw 11.6.1.2 states that an institution’s coaching staff may attend a contest in the institution’s conference championship or an NCAA championship contest in which a future opponent participates (e.g., an opponent on the institution’s spring nonchampionship-segment schedule participates in a fall conference or NCAA championship). (Adopted: 1/15/14)

 

Daily Compliance Item- 11/10/14- 12.1.2.1.3.2, 15.2.6.3- Financial Aid from High School Booster Association

Home Plate is a freshman baseball student-athlete at Ocean State University (OSU).  In addition to his $5000 athletic scholarship, Home was awarded a $1000 scholarship from his high school baseball booster association.
Assuming all of the parameters of the amateur and/or financial aid legislation are met, is it permissible for Home to accept the $1000 award from the baseball booster association?
Yes.  NCAA Educational Column- 11/5/14- Financial Aid from an Established and Continuing Program — Financial Aid from an Outside Sports Team or Organization (I)- states that institutions are reminded that NCAA Proposal No. ER-2014-5 reinforces the prohibition against pay for play by reflecting the language found in NCAA Bylaw 12.1.2.1.3.2, which prohibits a student-athlete from receiving financial aid through an established and continuing program to aid students that is provided by an outside sports team or organization that conducts a competitive sports program to an individual who is or has been a member of that team or organization, in Bylaw 15.2.6.3.
This editorial revision adds the prohibition to where the membership would most likely look for guidance when evaluating outside aid. Consistent with previous application, the prohibition does not extend to situations where the individual has not represented the awarding team or organization in competition. Consequently, it does not eliminate many traditional scholarships given by parent organizations, competition organizers, etc., to individuals who have not competed on behalf of the awarding organization (e.g., individuals who have not represented the awarding organization in all-star games, zone meets, state games). However, in situations where the individual has represented the awarding team or organization in competition, the scholarship amount, number of times awarded, additional criteria (including whether members of the organization that have not represented the organization in competition are eligible to receive the aid), and the amount of time that has elapsed between representing the awarding team or organization and receipt of the aid does not alter the application of the prohibition against pay for play.The following scenarios are intended to assist the membership in consistently applying the legislation. For purposes of these scenarios, it is assumed the other provisions of Bylaw 15.2.6.3 are met.
Scenario No.1: Student-athlete received a scholarship from the high school baseball booster club, which provides a scholarship each year to one outstanding graduating senior on the baseball team.
Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid. The high school booster club is not an outside sport team or outside organization that conducts an athletics program. And, although the recipient represents the high school team, he or she has not represented the booster club in competition.
Scenario No. 2: Student-athlete received a scholarship the high school provides each year to one outstanding graduating senior athlete.
Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid. The high school is not an outside sport team or outside organization that conducts an athletics program.
Scenario No. 3: Student-athlete received an honor scholarship from the high school athletics association. Each year, the high school athletics association provides this scholarship to one graduating senior who participates in the state tournament. The student-athlete participates in a state vs. state all-star tournament subsequent to the state tournament.
Application: The student-athlete may not receive the aid. The high school athletics association is an outside organization that conducts an athletics program and the recipient represented the high school athletics association in competition as a member of a team it organized.
Scenario No. 4: Student-athlete received a memorial scholarship from an area golf association provided to a graduating high school senior who best exemplifies the qualities of the individual for whom the scholarship is named. In order to participate in junior golf competitions in the area individuals must be a member of the association.
Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid if he or she has only represented himself or herself or a team other than one representing the area golf association in competition. If the student-athlete has represented the area golf association in competition, then it is not permissible for him or her to receive the scholarship.
Scenario No. 5: Student-athlete received a scholarship from the local football league based on community service, leadership and academics. Only graduating high school seniors who participated on a Pop Warner team sponsored by the league are eligible for consideration.
Application: The student-athlete may receive the aid only if he or she has never represented the local football league in competition (e.g., as a member of a league all-star team vs. other league all-star teams). If the student-athlete has represented the local football league in competition, then it is not permissible for him or her to receive the scholarship.
Scenario No. 6: Student-athlete received a scholarship provided yearly to a graduating high school senior by the local swimming committee. The student-athlete represented the local swimming committee during one zone competition against other local swimming committees two years prior.Application: The student-athlete represented the awarding organization in competition as a member of a team it organized. Therefore, the student-athlete is not permitted to receive the aid.
[References: NCAA Bylaws 12.1.2.1.3.2 (educational expenses from outside sports team or organization — after collegiate enrollment) and 15.2.6.3 (financial aid from an established and continuing program)] 

Daily Compliance Item- 11/7/14- Current Event

Southern Miss basketball, Donnie Tyndall under NCAA review 
USAToday.com
KNOXVILLE — The men’s basketball program at Southern Miss is under investigation by the NCAA for violations that are alleged to have occurred during Tennessee coach Donnie Tyndall’s tenure there, multiple media outlets reported ThursdayThe investigation reportedly stems from possible financial assistance that was given to Southern Miss players who were academically ineligible at the time.
Under the NCAA’s Proposition 48, ineligible players are able to take coursework to become eligible prior to receiving a scholarship. But the investigation, first reported by Bleacher Report, will examine how tuition fees were handled for those ineligible players.
In a previously scheduled press conference Thursday, Tyndall said he would cooperate with the investigation, if asked.
“That’s all I will say or can say at this time,” he said.
Tyndall added that he has not yet been contacted by any investigators.
Later in the day, the athletic department released a statement regarding the investigation into the former program of Tyndall, who was hired as the Vols’ coach in April.
“We are aware of the situation at Southern Miss and will not comment further until there is a resolution,” the statement read. “We have an extensive vetting process with all potential coaching candidates, including very specific conversations with the NCAA and school officials at Southern Miss regarding compliance during Coach Tyndall’s tenure there, during which no issues were brought to our attention.
“In a statement, Southern Miss acknowledged that the school is “working together with the NCAA to review potential issues related to our men’s basketball program.
“This is not the first time that a Tyndall-led program has been accused of committing violations. In 2010, sanctions were brought on Tyndall’s Morehead State program for an incident that involved a booster offering improper benefits to recruits, among other violations.
Upon his hiring at Tennessee, Tyndall told reporters that the Morehead State situation was a learning experience for him.
Tennessee’s program received some more bad news Thursday when guard Chris Clarke, from Virginia Beach, Va., decommitted from the Vols and committed to Virginia Tech.
His father told The Knoxville News-Sentinel that the decision to decommit from Tyndall and Tennessee was unrelated to the news of the NCAA investigation. Just a week earlier, Clarke had announced that he would join the Vols next season.
This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Daily Compliance Item- 11/6/14- 13.12.1.7, 13.12.1.7.2- Payment of Camp Expenses by Camp Employee

Which of the following is true?
A.  HS coach working Ocean State University’s (OSU) women’s basketball camp may pay the camp registration fee for a prospect as long as she is not being recruited by OSU.
B.  HS Coach working OSU’s women’s basketball camp may pay the camp registration fee for any prospect.
C.  HS Coach working OSU’s women’s basketball camp may pay the camp registration fee for a prospect as long as she is not an athletics award winner or being recruited by OSU.
D.  HS Coach working OSU’s women’s basketball camp may not pay the camp registration fee for any prospect.
 
The answer is CNCAA Official Interpretation- 10/30/14- Expenses to Attend an Institutional Camp or Clinic from a Camp or Clinic Employee (I)-states that it is not permissible for an employee of an institutional camp or clinic (e.g., high school coach, two-year college coach) to provide actual and necessary expenses, including the camp admissions fee, for a prospective student-athlete who is an athletics award winner or is being recruited by the institution to attend the camp or clinic.
 [References: NCAA Bylaws 12.1.2.1.4.3 (expenses from an outside sponsor), 13.12.1.7.1 (employment of prospective student-athletes/no free or reduced admission privileges — general rule), 13.12.1.7.2 (payment of expenses); and an official interpretation (10/30/14, Item No. 1)]

Daily Compliance Item- 11/5/14- 17.1.7.2.2, 17.1.7.2.3, 17.3.3.1(a)- Conducted in Privacy and Conducted in the View of the General Public

DID YOU KNOW…
There is a difference in the standards of “conducted in privacy” and “conducted in view of a general public audience”
To satisfy the standard of “conducted in privacy” an institution must ensure that no one from the general public can view the scrimmages. The facility where the scrimmage is occurring must be closed to the general public and the department of athletics must keep anyone from the general public from entering the gym. Further, the legislation specifically requires an institution to ensure that no one other than department of athletics staff members and those individuals necessary to conduct the practice scrimmage are present.
An institution wants to host an informal men’s basketball scrimmage.  Which is the correct standard to apply?
A.  Conducted in privacy
B.  Conducted in view of a general public audience
The answer is A.
With regard to “conducted in view of a general public audience”and skill-related instruction, the intent of the legislation is to prohibit institutions from creating special activities or events in conjunction with skill-instruction sessions as a way of creating the appearance of full-fledged practice outside of the playing season or creating a celebrity atmosphere during prospective student-athletes’ campus visits. 
The legislation does not require complete privacy during skill-related instruction; however, it requires that institutions do not schedule or conduct the sessions in a way in which they become spectator events.
True or False… A member of the general public may walk into a facility and watch skill-related instruction?
The answer is True. A member of the general public could walk into a facility where a team is involved in skill-related instruction on his or her own without the instruction being considered in view of a general public audience. However, an institution could not arrange to conduct skill-related instruction in a facility or at a time in which the institution had reason to believe that the skill instruction session would be conducted in view of a general public audience. For example, it would not be permissible for an institution to conduct skill instruction for its basketball team on the football field immediately following a home football game. This situation would constitute conducting skill-related instruction in view of a general public audience.
 
NCAA Educational Column- 11/4/14- Viewing Skill-related Instruction Sessions and Informal Basketball Practice Scrimmages (I)- states that NCAA Division I institutions should note that in accordance with NCAA legislation regarding skill instruction and practice scrimmages, an institution may not publicize skill-related instruction that occurs outside the playing season and informal practice scrimmages in basketball. Also, an institution may not conduct skill-related instruction sessions in view of a general public audience. Informal practice scrimmages in basketball must be held in complete privacy.
The following questions and answers are designed to assist member institutions in applying the legislation regarding the viewing of skill-related instruction that is permissible outside the playing season in all sports other than football and informal practice scrimmages in basketball:
Question No. 1: May prospective student-athletes view skill-related instruction while on official or unofficial visits?
Answer: Yes. It is permissible for prospective student-athletes to view skill-related instruction during official or unofficial visits, provided the skill-instruction has not been publicized and is not held in view of a general public audience.
Question No. 2: May individuals accompanying prospective student-athletes on official or unofficial visits (e.g., parent, sibling, coach) view skill-related instruction?
Answer: Yes. It is permissible for individuals accompanying prospective student-athletes on official or unofficial visits to view skill-related instruction, provided the skill instruction has not been publicized and is not held in view of a general public audience.
Question No. 3: May an institution invite individuals (e.g., boosters, high school coaches) to watch a team’s skill-related instruction or in basketball, an informal practice scrimmage?
Answer: No, if an institution were to invite an individual or individuals to a skill-related instruction session or an informal practice scrimmage it would be considered publicizing the activity, which is prohibited by the legislation.
Question No. 4: May a member of the general public walk into a facility and watch skill-related instruction?
Answer: Yes. A member of the general public could walk into a facility where a team is involved in skill-related instruction on his or her own without the instruction being considered in view of a general public audience. However, an institution could not arrange to conduct skill-related instruction in a facility or at a time in which the institution had reason to believe that the skill instruction session would be conducted in view of a general public audience. For example, it would not be permissible for an institution to conduct skill instruction for its basketball team on the football field immediately following a home football game. This situation would constitute conducting skill-related instruction in view of a general public audience.
Question No. 5: May prospective student-athletes in basketball view an informal practice scrimmage while on official or unofficial visits?
Answer: Yes. Basketball prospective student-athletes (and those individuals accompanying the prospective student-athlete) are permitted to view informal practice scrimmages while on an official or unofficial visit.
Question No. 6: What is the difference between the standards of “conducted in privacy” and “conducted in view of a general public audience”?
Answer: Informal practice scrimmages in basketball must be conducted in privacy. To satisfy this standard, an institution must ensure that no one from the general public can view the scrimmages. The facility where the scrimmage is occurring must be closed to the general public and the department of athletics must keep anyone from the general public from entering the gym. Further, the legislation specifically requires an institution to ensure that no one other than department of athletics staff members and those individuals necessary to conduct the practice scrimmage are present.
In contrast, the legislation regulating skill-related instruction specifies that skill related instruction sessions shall not be conducted in view of a general public audience. The intent of the legislation is to prohibit institutions from creating special activities or events in conjunction with skill-instruction sessions as a way of creating the appearance of full-fledged practice outside of the playing season or creating a celebrity atmosphere during prospective student-athletes’ campus visits.
The legislation does not require complete privacy during skill-related instruction; however, it requires that institutions do not schedule or conduct the sessions in a way in which they become spectator events.
[References: NCAA Bylaws 17.1.7.2.2 (skill instruction — sports other than baseball and football), 17.1.7.2.3 (skill instruction — baseball), 17.3.3.1-(a) (practice scrimmage), 17.3.5.3-(h) (practice scrimmage), and staff interpretation (3/15/2013)]

Daily Compliance Item- 11/4/14- 12.4.1, 12.5.2.1- Student-Athlete Endorsing a Political Campaign

Bump N. Run is a football student-athlete at Ocean State University.  With political science being his major, Bump has been helping out with one of the local candidate’s campaigns.  Is it permissible for Bump to endorse a candidate running for office?
Yes.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 12/30/87- Student-athlete endorsement of political candidate– states that enrolled student-athletes could be involved in the endorsement of a political candidate provided the student-athletes receive no remuneration for their involvement and are not obligated to make any time commitments; suggested that the following disclaimer be utilized in any press releases containing their names:
The student-athletes are acting as citizens of the state, and do not necessarily represent the views of their institutions of higher education or the NCAA.”
Current employment legislation (Bylaw 12.4.1) would allow a student-athlete to earn income as any other employee in the candidate’s office (e.g., stuffing envelopes, handing out fliers).

Daily Compliance Item- 11/3/14- 13.12.1.7- Assistance with Camp Costs

Ocean State University recently published its camp and clinic dates for summer of 2015.  As part of its community assistance program, a local business would like to help pay the costs for 10 individuals to attend the camp of their choice.  Would it be permissible for a prospect aged individual to receive such assistance?
Yes with conditions.  NCAA Official Interpretation- 10/30/14- Expenses to Attend an Institutional Camp or Clinic that Conducts Organized Competition (I)- states that an individual may receive actual and necessary expenses to attend an institutional camp or clinic from an outside sponsor (e.g., team, neighbor, business) other than an agent or a representative of an institution’s athletics interests (and, after initial full-time collegiate enrollment, other than a professional sports organization), provided the camp or clinic conducts organized competition in the sport for its participants. The committee noted that it is not permissible for an employee of an institutional camp or clinic (e.g., high school coach, two-year college coach) to provide actual and necessary expenses, including the camp admissions fee, for a prospective student-athlete who is an athletics award winner or is being recruited by the institution to attend the camp or clinic.
[References: NCAA Bylaws 12.1.2.1.4.3 (expenses from an outside sponsor), 13.12.1.7.1 (employment of prospective student-athletes/no free or reduced admission privileges — general rule), 13.12.1.7.2 (payment of expenses); official interpretation (2/19/87, Item No. 11) and official interpretation (10/30/14, Item No. 2)]