Daily Compliance Item- 10/7/13- 13.4.1.1, 13.4.1.2, 13.4.1.3- Photos Sent to Prospects

The head men’s basketball coach at Ocean State University wants to send a picture as an attachment to a text message to a few junior prospects.  The picture is of the newly renovated locker room.  Is this permissible?  If so, can the coach use instagram to alter the picture?

The men’s basketball coach is permitted to send such a picture as an attachment to the junior prospects, but it is NOT permissible to use software to add content to the photograph.  NCAA Educational Column- 10/10/12-  Photographs as Attachments to General Correspondence and Electronic Transmissions (I)-  states that NCAA Division I institutions should note an institution may send a photograph to a prospective student-athlete as an attachment to general correspondence (printed on plain white paper with black ink) or electronic transmissions, provided the information in the photograph was not altered or staged for a recruiting purpose.

The following questions and answers are designed to assist the Division I membership with the application of legislation related to photographs as attachments.

Question: May a coaching staff member send a photograph via text message without the photo being considered an attachment?

Answer: No.

 

Question: May a coaching staff member send a photograph via email without the photo being considered an attachment?

Answer: No.

Question: Are photographs used as institutional letterhead subject to the same restrictions as other photographs used as attachments?

Answer: No. However, if the photos are used in any other manner, those other uses remain subject to the restrictions on photographs as attachments. For example, a photo of an institution’s competition facility used in institutional letterhead is not subject to the restrictions on photographs as attachments. However, if a coach at the institution wants to send the photo used in the institutional letterhead to a prospective student-athlete as an attachment to either general correspondence or an electronic transmission, then the photo being sent to the prospective student-athlete cannot be altered or staged for a recruiting purpose.

Question: May a men’s basketball coaching staff member send a photo of a team practice to a men’s basketball student-athlete as an attachment to a text message?

Answer: Yes, provided the content was not altered or staged for a recruiting purpose.

Question: May a football coach send a photo of the institution’s pep rally to a prospective student-athlete as an attachment to a direct message on twitter?

Answer: Yes, provided the content was not altered or staged for a recruiting purpose.

Question: May a basketball coach take a photo of a room not available to the general public (e.g., institution’s trophy room, team meeting room, locker room, etc.) and send it to a prospective student-athlete as an attachment to a text message.

Answer: Yes, provided the content was not altered or staged for a recruiting purpose.

Question: May a coach take a photo, use software to add content to the photograph and send it to a prospective student-athlete as an attachment it to an email or direct social media message?

Answer: No, a photograph that has been altered or staged for a recruiting purpose cannot be sent to a prospective student-athlete. However, standard photo editing (e.g., cropping, red-eye reduction, filters, color correction, etc.) is permissible.

Question: May a soccer coach arrange for a photo of the university’s president, famous alumni and mascot to be taken and sent to a prospective student-athlete as an attachment to an email?

Answer: No, the content of the photograph may not be staged for the purpose of being sent to a prospective student-athlete.

 

[References: NCAA Bylaws 13.4.1.1 (printed recruiting materials), 13.4.1.2 (electronic transmissions), 13.4.1.2.1 (exception — men’s basketball), 13.4.1.3 (other recruiting materials); an official interpretation (3/14/2007); and a staff interpretation (8/30/12, Item No. f)]

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