Daily Compliance Item- 5/21/13- 14.1.8.1- Receipt of Degree

Hail Mary is a football student-athlete who will be transferring to Ocean State University (OSU) this fall.  Hail will have all the requirements met for graduation at his current school prior to transferring to OSU, but he will not have received his degree prior to the transfer.  Is Hail still eligible to use the graduate one-time transfer exception?

 

Yes with conditions.  NCAA Educational Column- 4/11/13-  Graduate Student-Athlete Eligibility (I) – states that  NCAA Division I institutions should note that a student-athlete who is enrolled in a graduate or professional school of the same institution from which he or she previously received a baccalaureate degree, a student-athlete who is enrolled and seeking a second baccalaureate or equivalent degree at the same institution, or a student-athlete who has graduated and is continuing as a full-time student at the same institution while taking course work that would lead to the equivalent of another major or degree as defined and documented by the institution, may participate in intercollegiate athletics, provided the student has eligibility remaining and such participation occurs within the applicable five-year period.

 

Further, a graduate student-athlete who is enrolled in a graduate or professional school of an institution other than the institution from which he or she previously received a baccalaureate degree may participate in intercollegiate athletics if the student fulfills the conditions of the one-time transfer exception and has eligibility remaining.

 

Finally, a graduate student-athlete who does not meet the one-time transfer exception due to participation in a sport for which the exception is not available, shall qualify for the one-time transfer exception as a graduate student, provided the student:

 

(a) Fulfills the remaining conditions of the one-time transfer exception;

(b) Has at least one season of competition remaining; and

(c) The student’s previous institution did not renew his or her athletically related financial aid for the following academic year.

 

The following questions and answers are designed to assist the Division I membership with the application of graduate student-athlete eligibility legislation.

 

Admission and Enrollment

Question No. 1: Is it permissible for a graduate student-athlete to compete if he or she is considered a nondegree seeking graduate student?

Answer: No. Graduate student-athletes must be regularly enrolled, degree seeking students.

 

Question No. 2: Is a graduate student-athlete who is a regularly enrolled, degree seeking student eligible to compete even though he or she is not enrolled in a specific graduate degree program (e.g., graduate at large)?

Answer: Yes.

 

Question No. 3: Is a graduate student-athlete eligible to compete if he or she is a regularly enrolled, degree seeking student but is required to earn, as a condition of continued enrollment in the graduate program, an enhanced grade-point-average (e.g., 3.00 or above) in each term of his or her first academic year as a graduate student at the certifying institution?

Answer: Yes, provided the student-athlete is considered to be in good academic standing as interpreted for all students by the appropriate academic officials at the institution.

 

Transfer Graduate Student-Athletes

Question No. 4: May a student-athlete use the graduate student one-time transfer exception to pursue a second baccalaureate degree at the next institution?

Answer: No. A student-athlete who has previously graduated must be enrolled in a graduate or professional school at the next institution to qualify for the one-time transfer exception.

 

Question No. 5: Can a student-athlete who graduates after three years and has more than one season of competition remaining use the graduate student one-time transfer exception?

Answer: Yes, provided the student meets the requirements of the exception and is regularly enrolled as a degree seeking student in a graduate or professional school at the next institution.

 

Question No. 6: In sports for which the standard one-time transfer exception does not apply, may a student-athlete who is notified of the nonrenewal of athletics aid after indicating intent to transfer to another institution use the one-time transfer exception for graduate student eligibility?

Answer: Yes. The timing of the nonrenewal of athletics aid does not impact a student-athlete’s ability to qualify for the graduate student one-time transfer exception, provided all criteria for the exception are met.

 

Question No. 7: May a student-athlete who transfers after completing all necessary degree requirements for graduation from a four-year institution but prior to receiving a degree be eligible to use the graduate one-time transfer exception?

Answer: Yes, provided the student-athlete is accepted for enrollment as a degree seeking student in a graduate or professional school of an institution other than the institution he or she previously attended as an undergraduate.

 

Question No. 8: May a baseball or basketball graduate student-athlete who qualifies for the one-time transfer exception but initially enrolls as a full-time student at the certifying institution after the first term of the academic year (e.g., midyear transfer) be eligible for competition immediately?

Answer: No. Such a student-athlete cannot be eligible for competition until the following academic year.

 

Progress-Toward Degree Certification

Question No. 9: Is a football student-athlete who graduated with a baccalaureate degree required to earn nine semester hours or eight quarter hours and the APR eligibility point during the fall term to be eligible for all contests during the following playing season?

Answer: No.

 

Question No. 10: Must credits earned by a graduate or postbaccalaureate student-athlete be degree applicable to satisfy the six semester or quarter hour requirement?

Answer: Credits acceptable toward any degree program offered by the certifying institution (graduate or undergraduate) may be used to satisfy the six semester or quarter hour requirement, provided the student-athlete is permitted to complete such courses in accordance with published institutional policies applicable to graduate students.

 

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 14.1.6.1 (admission), 14.1.6.1.1 (special admission), 14.1.8 (graduate student/postbaccalaureate participation), 14.1.8.1 (one-time transfer exception), 14.5.2.2.10 (one-time transfer exception), 14.4.3.1-(c) (fulfillment of credit-hour requirements) 14.4.3.1.6 (additional requirements — football), 14.4.3.1.6.1 (regaining eligibility for two contests), 14.4.3.1.6.2 (regaining full eligibility — one-time exception), 14.4.3.5-(c) (exceptions to progress-toward-degree rule — graduate student/postbaccalaureate exception), staff interpretations (09/26/2006, Item No. 1a, 03/15/2013, Item No. a), and official interpretations (4/17/2007, Item No. 15-a, 10/19/2012, Item No. 3)]

Daily Compliance Item- 5/20/13- 15.2.8.1.2, 16.5.2- Summer Aid vs. Summer Expenses

Clay Court is a tennis student-athlete at Ocean State University.  Clay and a few of his teammates have qualified for the NCAA championships, so they are required to remain on campus to practice.  Additionally, Clay has enrolled in summer school classes that will take place while he is preparing for the tournament.  Clay is receiving a full athletic scholarship to cover his summer school expenses.  As part of his full scholarship, Clay will receive the full cost of room and board.

Is it permissible for Ocean State University to provide Clay with the same room and board stipend as his teammates that are not enrolled in summer school?

No.  Clay is receiving financial aid to cover the full cost of room and board, and he is not permitted to receive any expenses in excess of the full cost of room and board.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 5/13/11- Summer Financial Aid and Vacation Period Expenses (I)- states that a student-athlete who is enrolled in an institution’s summer term, and is required to remain on campus for organized practice sessions (e.g., practice in preparation for an NCAA championship), may receive financial aid in accordance with the summer financial-aid legislation and vacation-period expenses, provided the student-athlete does not receive vacation-period expenses, in combination with any room and board financial aid, in excess of the full cost of room and board (as determined for financial aid purposes) during the time in which the student-athlete is required to remain on campus for practice or competition.

[References: NCAA Bylaws 15.2.8.1.2 (enrolled student-athletes), 16.5.2 (vacation-period expenses) and staff interpretation (04/12/1991, Item Ref d), which has been archived]

Daily Compliance Item- 5/17/13- Current Event

WELL DONE GUYS!

How college players saved 1-year-old boy’s life

USA TODAY.com

Most college baseball teams are content with relaxing after a day of traveling.

The Millersville University Marauders planned to take it easy, but instead played the role of rescuers on a rainy day in Johnstown, Pa., on May 8.

Seven Millersville players came to the rescue of a family by saving their 1-year-old boy’s life. Lancaster Online was first to report the story.

The Millersville Athletics department noted that Zach Stone, David Pine, Tyler McDonald, Tyler Orris, Dan Stoltzfus, Evan King and Tyler Thomas were all at the scene when Braydin Norman’s parents were screaming for help. The main paramedic from Johnstown EMS, Mindy Maraj-Owens, confirmed to USA TODAY Sports on Thursday that several baseball players were present when the ambulance arrived to a 911 call.

Stone, Pine and McDonald were the main heroes when it came to saving the child’s life.

The boy, who had a 104-degree fever, was suffering a febrile seizure and choking when the players first encountered the family around 1 a.m. while they were going out for a late snack.

Via Lancaster Online:

“We heard two people screaming in a car, and it turned into driveway right in front of us,” Stone told Lancaster Online. “A dad hopped out of a car and picked up his kid. He just looked limp. … The kid didn’t look like he had any life to him.”

Pine added, “He was screaming and yelling, ‘My son is choking! He’s having a seizure! Somebody help!’ ”

According to the Lancaster Online report, McDonald coached the mother, Megan Norman, and the father, Shane Norman, through CPR while Pine called 911 on his cellphone. Stone was checking for Braydin’s pulse while team members helped comfort the family. After several minutes of CPR, the boy began to open his eyes.

“The parents were very appreciative of the boys,” Maraj-Owens said. “They were panicked and worried for their child’s life when he stopped breathing. They said the players helped save (Braydin). He was alert and oriented when I arrived.”

Mike Brawley, manager of the EMS in Johnstown, said Braydin was transported to Conemaugh Hospital from the family’s location at Somerset and Napoleon streets.

After the team’s heroics, the family tracked down the team through Facebook. One of the Millersville players had placed a bracelet around Braydin’s wrist before he went in the ambulance. The family attended a May 10 game against Gannon as fans.

“Them being there, and being calm, and telling me what to do — it made all the difference in the world,” Megan Norman told Lancaster Online.

“If they hadn’t been walking to get something to eat at 1 in the morning, we could have lost him. I’m very grateful. They are a great group of kids. They have some true fans for life.”

Millersville’s baseball team is 18-6 in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference and 38-16 overall. They are playing in the Division II NCAA Atlantic Regional today in North Carolina

Daily Compliance Item- 5/16/13- Countable Telephone Calls

Which of the following could be considered a countable telephone call?

A.  Telephone call initiated by a coaching staff member

B.  Conference call initiated by a coaching staff member

C.  Video-conference initiated by a coaching staff member

D.  All of the above

The answer is D.  NCAA Bylaw 13.02.15 states that all electronically transmitted human voice exchange (including videoconferencing and videophones) shall be considered telephone calls.    (Adopted: 1/10/95, Revised: 1/9/96 effective 8/1/96, 1/14/97, 4/27/00 effective 8/1/00, 9/6/00, 4/29/04 effective 8/1/04, 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

 

This legislation is applicable to Divisions I and II.

Daily Compliance Item- 5/15/13- 12.5.2.3.3- Athletic Ability to Win a Prize

Ocean State University (OSU) conducts a promotional activity between the 4th and 5th innings of all its home baseball games.  This activity includes hitting a ball from a pitching machine.  If the person hits a home run, he/she wins $100.  To participate in this activity, the person must fill out the designated card and drop it in the box.  Any individual attending the game is permitted to enter and the participants are randomly selected.  At today’s game, a current football student-athlete was selected to be one of the participants.  If he hits a home run, is he permitted to accept the $100 prize?

Yes.  NCAA Bylaw 12.5.2.3.3 states that receipt of a prize for winning an institutional or noninstitutional promotional activity (e.g., making a half-court basketball shot, being involved in a money scramble) by a prospective or enrolled student-athlete (or a member of his or her family) does not affect his or her eligibility, provided the prize is won through a random drawing in which all members of the general public or the student body are eligible to participate. (Revised: 1/9/96 effective 8/1/96, 3/25/05, 6/12/07)

Daily Compliance Item- 5/14/13- 13.11.2.3- Activities During Unofficial Visit

Dog Leg is a prospective student-athlete being recruited by the golf coaches at Ocean State University.  Dog is taking an unofficial visit this weekend and would like to hit some balls while on campus.  The current student-athletes can bring dog as their guest for a $10 fee.

Dog is permitted to hit balls with the current student-athletes as long as which of the following occurs?

 

  1. Dog pays the $10 fee
  2. The coaches do not watch Dog hitting balls with the current student-athletes
  3. None of the above
  4. Both of the above

The answer is 4.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 5/13/11- Recreational Activities During Official or Unofficial Visit (I)- states that during an official or unofficial visit, a prospective student-athlete may participate in recreational activities in a facility (on- or off-campus) that is not open to the general public (e.g., campus recreation center, golf course, swimming pool), provided such activities are not organized or observed by members of the athletics department coaching staff (including strength and conditioning coaches) and are not designed to test the athletics abilities of the prospective student-athlete. Further, in situations in which there is a fee associated with the use of the facility (e.g., guest fee at a private facility used by the institution for practice or competition, admission fee for open swim session at institutional recreation center), a prospective student-athlete shall pay the going rate associated with the use of that facility.

 

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 12.1.2.1.6 (preferential treatment, benefits, or services), 13.2 (offers and inducements), 13.6 (official (paid) visit), 13.7 (unofficial (nonpaid) visit) and 13.11.2.2 (recreational activities); staff interpretations (5/26/10, Item No. 1) and (9/4/08, Item No. a), which has been archived]

Daily Compliance Item- 5/13/13- 13.12.1.7.4- Free Items to Campers

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University purchased apparel, etc. from Nike for their summer camps this year.  As a thank you for their business, Nike sent Ocean State University towels to give out during their camps.

Can the coaches give the towels free of charge to the campers?

 

No.  NCAA Bylaw 13.12.1.7.4 states that prospective student-athletes may receive awards from a member institution’s sports camp or clinic with the understanding that the cost of such awards is included in the admissions fees charged for participants in the camp or clinic.

NCAA Educational Column- 4/9/09- Attendance Restrictions at Institutional and Noninstitutional Camps/Clinics and Material Benefits Provided at Institutional Camps/Clinics (I) states that NCAA Division I institutions should note that pursuant to NCAA Bylaw 13.12.1.2, an institution’s sports camp or clinic must be open to any and all entrants.  An institutional camp or clinic is any camp that is owned or operated by the institution or an athletics department staff member at the institution and includes participants who are prospective student-athletes. An institution may limit the attendance at its sports camps and clinics only by number, age, grade level and/or gender. Further, Bylaw 13.12.2.3.3 permits athletics department personnel, in sports other than basketball, to serve in any capacity at a noninstitutional, privately owned camp or clinic that involves prospective student-athletes as participants, provided the camp is operated in accordance with restrictions applicable to institutional camps (e.g., open to any and all entrants, no free or reduced admission to or employment of athletics award winners, etc.).

Finally, in accordance with Bylaw 13.12.1.7.4, prospective student-athletes may receive material benefits (e.g., awards, prizes, apparel) from an institution’s sports camp or clinic only if the cost of the material benefits is included in the admissions fees charged for the camp or clinic.

Recently, the NCAA Division I Legislative Council reviewed issues related to the promotion of institutional camps and clinics.  The council issued an official interpretation determining that an institution may advertise or promote an institutional camp or clinic in any way, provided any camp or clinic advertisement or promotion (e.g., camp brochure, Web site, newspaper or magazine advertisement) stipulates that the camp or clinic is open to any and all entrants (limited only by number, age, grade level and/or gender).  The following questions and answers are designed to assist Division I institutions in the correct application of these bylaws.

 Attendance Restrictions

Question:  Is it permissible for an institution to limit the attendance at a sports camp or clinic based on the skill level of the participants (e.g., elite athletes, letter award winners, high school varsity athletes)?

Answer:  No, it is not permissible for an institution to limit the attendance at a sports camp or clinic in any way based on skill level.  The only permissible limitations on attendance are number, age, grade level and/or gender.

Question:  May an institution advertise or promote an institutional sports camp or clinic as an “elite” camp or clinic?

Answer:  Yes, an institution may use any words or phrases to advertise or promote its institutional camps and clinics, provided the advertisement or promotion states that the camp or clinic is open to any and all entrants, in accordance with camps and clinics legislation.

Question:  If it appears that an institutional camp or clinic is open to any and all entrants (e.g., no reference to elite camp) is an institution required to include a specific statement stipulating that the camp or clinic is open to any and all entrants on all advertisements or promotions for the camp or clinic?

Answer:  Yes, all institutional camp and clinic advertisements and promotions must include a statement stipulating that the camp or clinic is open to any and all entrants, regardless of how the camp or clinic is advertised.

Question:  May an institution include a statement or description in a camp or clinic advertisement that states advanced techniques will be taught at a camp or clinic without violating the attendance restriction regulations?

Answer:  Yes, a statement or description may be included in an advertisement to inform potential participants of the level of instruction that will be provided at the camp or clinic, including advanced techniques, to allow the participants to make an informed decision about attendance at the camp or clinic.  The advertisement, however, must stipulate that the camp or clinic is open to any and all entrants, in accordance with camps and clinics legislation.

Question:  May an institution advertise and/or conduct a camp or clinic as a position camp?  For example, may a volleyball program conduct a “setter’s camp”??

Answer:  Yes, institutions may conduct position camps provided no level of experience, skill or ability is required and the camp is open to any and all entrants.  Any advertisements must include a statement stipulating that the camp or clinic is open to any and all entrants, in accordance with camps and clinics legislation.

Question:  May an institution conduct an “invitation only” camp?

Answer:  No.  “Invitation only” camps are not permissible because attendance it is not open to any and all entrants, limited only by number, age, grade level and/or gender.

Question:  Is it permissible for a coach to invite certain prospective student-athletes to a camp that is open to any and all entrants?

Answer:  Yes, an institution’s coach may invite certain prospective student-athletes to a camp, provided the camp is open to any and all entrants. However, an institution may not provide any type of priority registration for specific prospects. Additionally, an institution must abide by all applicable recruiting legislation when inviting certain prospects to a camp. For example, a coach may not call or write a prospective student-athlete in ninth grade to extend a camp invitation.

Question:  May an institution reserve spots at a camp or clinic for specific prospective student-athletes?

Answer:  No, an institution is not permitted to reserve spots at a camp or clinic for specific prospective student-athletes.  For example, if a camp is limited to the first 100 entrants, the institution may not reserve 25 of the 100 places for the coach’s top recruits.  The coach would be permitted to invite those 25 recruits; however, if any of them are not within the first 100 to register, they would not be permitted to attend the camp or clinic.

Question:  Is it permissible for an institution to conduct team camps without violating camps and clinics attendance restriction legislation?

Answer:  Yes, an institution is permitted to conduct a team camp.  A team camp must be open to any and all teams limited only by number of teams, age of the members of the teams, grade level of members of the teams (e.g., high school, middle school) and/or the gender of the teams.

It should also be noted that the promotion of team camps is held to the same restrictions as any other institutional sports camp or clinic.  Therefore, team camp advertisements and promotions must include a statement stipulating that the camp is open to any and all teams, limited only by number, age, grade level and/or gender.

Question:  May an institution’s athletics department staff member work at a noninstitutional camp or clinic that is advertised as an elite camp or clinic?

Answer:  Yes, provided the camp is conducted in accordance with the legislation regulating institutional camps or clinics.  Therefore, in order for an athletics department staff member to be employed on a salaried or volunteer basis at a noninstitutional camp or clinic, advertisements or promotional materials must stipulate that the camp or clinic is open to any and all entrants.  Athletics department administrators (e.g., rules compliance personnel) are encouraged to review noninstitutional camps/clinics advertisements and promotional materials prior to permitting coaches and other athletics department staff members to be employed.

 Provision of Apparel and Awards

Question:  May an institution provide apparel and/or other merchandise (e.g., equipment, posters, gifts) to camp or clinic participants?

Answer:  Yes, an institution may provide apparel and/or merchandise to camp and clinic participants, provided the total cost of the items is included in each camp or clinic participant’s admissions fee.  If the cost of the items is not included in each participant’s admissions fee, then the institution is providing participants an impermissible benefit.  For example, if an institution provides each camp participant a basketball and a shirt valued at $45 but the camp admissions fee for each participant is only $40, the institution has provided an impermissible benefit to each participant who received those items.

 Question:  May an institution provide apparel and/or other merchandise (e.g., equipment, posters, gifts) that it receives free of charge or at a reduced rate to camp participants without including the normal retail cost of the item(s) in the participants admissions fee?

 Answer:  No, the institution must assign normal-retail value to the item(s) it provides to camp participants regardless of whether the institution received the item(s) free of charge or at a reduced rate.  The normal-retail value of the item(s) must be included in the participants’ admissions fee.

Question:  Per Bylaw 13.12.1.6.4, the cost of awards received by prospective student-athletes at an institutional camp or clinic must be included in the admissions fees charged to participants at the camp.  Does the full cost of each award have to be included in the admissions fee for each camp participant even though not all camp participants will receive an award?  For example, if all awards provided at the camp cost $100, does the $100 have to be included in each camp participant’s admissions fee?

Answer:  No, the full cost of each award does not need to be included in each participant’s admissions fees.  However, the full cost of the awards must be included collectively in the admissions fee for all camp participants.  For example, if the total cost of all awards to be given out at an institutional camp or clinic is $100 and the camp attendance is capped at 100 participants, each individual admissions fee would have to include an additional $1 used to cover the awards provided at the camp or clinic.