Daily Compliance Item- 2/14/13- 13.1.8.1, 13.1.8.2- Student-Athlete Speaking at Banquet

Button Hook is a football student-athlete at Ocean State University.  Button was contacted by an Athletic Director of a local high school to speak at the high school’s football team banquet.  Is this permissible?

Yes with conditions.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 2/13/13-Noncoaching Staff Members and Student-Athletes Speaking at Banquets (I)- states that noncoaching staff members without sport specific responsibilities (e.g., athletics director, compliance administrator, athletics academic counselor) are permitted to speak at a banquet attended by prospective student-athletes provided the noncoaching staff member does not have contact with the prospective student-athletes (or their parents/legal guardians) and does not make a recruiting presentation. Furthermore, it is permissible for a currently enrolled student-athlete to speak at a banquet attended by prospective student-athletes provided the student-athlete does not make a recruiting presentation and the promotional activity legislation is satisfied. If the student-athlete’s attendance at the event is not at the direction of an institutional staff member, then the student-athlete would be permitted to have contact with the prospective student-athletes in attendance.

[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 12.5.1.1 (institutional, charitable, education or nonprofit promotions), 13.1.2.7-(a) (off campus contacts), 13.1.8.1 (banquets or meetings at a prospective student-athlete’s educational institution), 13.1.8.2 (banquets or meetings at locations other than a prospect student-athletes educational institution); and a official interpretations (10/19/12, Item No. 11-a), and a (5/7/87), which has been archived]

Daily Compliance Item- 2/13/13- 14.1.3, 14.1.4.3- NCAA Forms

Clay Court is a student at Ocean State University.  Clay decided to try out for the men’s tennis team at the beginning of the spring 2013 term.  Clay has been practicing for five days and will compete in Ocean State University’s home meet this weekend.  Which statement is true?

A.  Clay does not have to complete the NCAA Drug-Testing Consent form until he has participated in countable athletically related activities for 14 days.

B.  Clay must complete the NCAA Drug-Testing Consent form prior to competing in the competition this weekend.

C.  Clay must complete the Student-Athlete Statement prior to competing in the meet this weekend.

D.  Both B & C are true

The answer is DNCAA Bylaw 14.1.3 states that prior to participation in intercollegiate competition each academic year, a student-athlete shall sign a statement in a form prescribed by the Legislative Council in which the student athlete submits information related to eligibility, recruitment, financial aid, amateur status, previous positive-drug tests administered by any other athletics organization and involvement in organized gambling activities related to intercollegiate or professional athletics competition under the Association’s governing legislation. Failure to complete and sign the statement shall result in the student-athlete’s ineligibility for participation in all intercollegiate competition. Violations of this bylaw do not affect a student-athlete’s eligibility if the violation occurred due to an institutional administrative error or oversight, and the student-athlete subsequently signs the form; however, the violation shall be considered an institutional violation per Constitution 2.8.1.

NCAA Bylaw 14.1.4.3 states that a student-athlete who is “trying out” for a team is not required to complete the form until 14 days from the first date the student-athlete engages in countable athletically related activities or before the student-athlete participates in a competition, whichever occurs earlier.  (Adopted:  4/27/06 effective 8/1/06)

Daily Compliance Item- 2/12/13- 14.7.1.7- Competing in an Open Lane

Kilo Meter is a track student-athlete at Ocean State University.  Kilo is red-shirting this year but would like to compete in a few meets as an unattached athlete.  If Kilo participates in an open lane during a collegiate competition between two institutions, will she have utilized a season of competition?

Yes.  NCAA Official Interpretation- 5/8/95- Student-Athletes Participating in ‘Open Lanes’ as Part of Collegiate Competition- states that a student-athlete who participates in an open lane as part of a collegiate competition (e.g., dual meet) is considered to be representing the institution against outside competition, regardless of whether the student-athlete’s performance is included in the scoring of the competition. Under such circumstances, the student-athlete’s participation satisfies the definition of intercollegiate competition and the student-athlete is charged with both a date of competition/contest and a season of competition in the applicable sport. [Reference: 14.02.6-(a) (intercollegiate competition)]

Daily Compliance Item- 2/11/13- 16.8.1.2.1.2

The Ocean State University men’s basketball team will be traveling to its conference tournament this weekend.  When confirming the flight arrangements for the trip, the institution’s travel coordinator noticed a significant cost difference if the team were to leave a day earlier.  The difference in price would save the institution $1500 per member of the official travel party.  If the head coach decides to leave a day earlier to take advantage of the cheaper fare, the student-athletes will be departing campus more than 48 hours prior to the first competition in the conference tournament.  Is it permissible for the team to depart campus earlier than 48 hours from the first competition?

Yes with a waiver granted by the Conference Office.  NCAA Bylaw 16.8.1.2.1.2 states that a conference may grant a waiver of the 48-hour departure restriction for extenuating circumstances associated with travel prior to competition in a conference championship event.  (Adopted:  4/24/08 

Daily Compliance Item- 2/8/13- Current Event

Report: Miami losing RBs coach; NCAA external review wrapping up

USAToday.com

With its 2013 signing day class wrapped up, Miami has a host of other issues still in front of it. Most immediately, it will have to find a new running backs coach if Terry Richardson leaves.

According to multiple reports, Richardson has taken the same position with the Jacksonville Jaguars. There, he will join Jedd Fisch, the ‘Canes offensive coordinator who is now with the Jags in the same capacity.

Beyond the field, the Hurricanes have to do deal with an ongoing NCAA investigation that was suspended by the NCAA while it conducted an external review of its information gathering procedures in the case.

The NCAA announced Wednesday that the external review is complete and the organization expects to get a full report by the end of next week.

Julie Roe Lach, the NCAA’s vice president of enforcement, approved a $20,000-$25,000 payment to the attorney of former Miami booster and convicted felon Nevin Shapiro to obtain information pertaining to the NCAA investigation.

Shapiro is the whistleblower who said he provided countless impermissible benefits to Miami players and recruits. As a result, the athletics program is NCAA under investigation.

Sources told CBSSports.com that Lach approved payments to Maria Elena Perez, Shapiro’s attorney, in return for information the NCAA would not have been able to gather otherwise.

Perez said there was nothing amiss about what the NCAA asked of her.

“There is nothing wrong,” she said.

ESPN.com reported that the NCAA general counsel Donald Remy and Roe Lach approved of using Elena Perez, although NCAA president Mark Emmert said that the request to use Shapiro’s attorney never reach Remy’s desk.

 

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Daily Compliance Item- 2/7/13- Rules Working Group Update

NCAA WORKING GROUP ON COLLEGIATE MODEL – RULES
Application of RWG Proposal No. 13-3 for 2013

 

Telephone Calls
 

 

Sport(s)                              Date                       Application
Women’s Basketball

April 11-30            One call to junior prospective student-athletes (PSAs)
May                      One call to junior PSAs
June 1-20              One call to junior PSAs (conclusion of year)
June 21-30            One call to junior PSAs (conclusion of year)
July 1-31               Three calls to PSAs following completion of junior year (limit of                                                                           one per week) (no communication during July evaluation periods                                                                          except with PSAs who signed NLI/admission/financial aid or                                                                            submitted a financial deposit)
August 1                Unlimited calls permissible to PSAs at beginning of senior year
September 1*        Unlimited calls permissible to PSAs at beginning of junior year

 

Football
April 15 – May 31   One call to junior PSAs
September 1             Unlimited calls to PSAs at beginning of senior year

 

Men’s Basketball
June 15                    Unlimited calls to PSAs at conclusion of sophomore year

 

Men’s Ice Hockey
June 15                    One call per month to PSAs at conclusion of sophomore through

July 31 after junior year
August 1                   Unlimited calls permissible to PSAs at beginning of senior year

 

Women’s Ice Hockey
July 7-31                  One call following the completion of the individual’s sophomore year
July 7                        Unlimited calls permissible to PSAs following completion of junior

year (or opending day of classes of senior year, whichever is earlier)

 

All other sports
July 1                        Unlimited calls permissible to PSAs following completion of junior

year (or opening day of classes of senior year, whichever is earlier)

*See Proposal No. 2013-1

 

Application of RWG Proposal No. 13-5-A for 2013

 

Printed Recruiting Material
 

 

Sport(s)                        Date                            Application

 

Men’s Basketball and Men’s Ice Hockey
June 15                       Printed material to PSAs at conclusion of sophomore year, subject                                                                          to current restrictions (Bylaw 13.4.1.1)
July 1                          Printed material to PSAs at conclusion of sophomore year, no content                                                                        restrictions

 

All Other Sports

July 1                          Printed material to PSAs at conclusion of junior year, no content                                                                          restrictions
September 1                Printed material to PSAs at beginning of junior year, no content                                                                         restrictions

 

Electronic Correspondence

 

Sport(s)                      Date                            Application

 

Men’s Basketball

June 15                       All forms of private electronic correspondence permissible to PSAs at
conclusion of sophomore year

 

Men’s Ice Hockey

June 15                       Electronic mail and facsimiles permissible to PSAs at conclusion of
sophomore year
July 1                          All forms of private electronic correspondence permissible to PSAs at
conclusion of sophomore year

 

All Other Sports

July 1                         All forms of private electronic correspondence permissible to PSAs at
conclusion of junior year

September 1               All forms of private electronic correspondence permissible to PSAs at
beginning of junior year

Daily Compliance Item- 2/6/13- 13.11.2.1- On- Campus Evaluations

On-Campus Evaluations are permissible in which of the following sports?

 

A.  Men’s Basketball

B.  Women’s Basketball

C.  Football

D.  Both A and B

The answer is D.  With the adoption of NCAA Proposal 2013-2, institutions may now conduct on-campus evaluations in the sport of women’s basketball.  NCAA Bylaw 13.11.2.1 states that in basketball, an institution may conduct an evaluation of a prospective student-athlete on its campus or at a site at which it normally conducts practice or competition, under the following conditions: (Adopted: 1/14/12, 1/19/13)

(a) For a high school or preparatory school senior, the evaluation may be conducted only after the conclusion of the prospective student-athlete’s season and after he or she has exhausted high school or preparatory school eligibility in basketball;

(b) For a two-year college prospective student-athlete, the evaluation may be conducted only after the conclusion of the prospective student-athlete’s season and he or she has exhausted his or her two-year college eligibility in basketball;

(c) For a four-year college prospective student-athlete, the evaluation may be conducted only after the conclusion of the prospective student-athlete’s season. (See Bylaw 13.1.1.3);

(d) The on-campus evaluation may be conducted only during the prospective student-athlete’s official or unofficial visit;

(e) The on-campus evaluation shall be conducted not later than the opening day of classes of the institution’s fall term;

(f) Not more than one on-campus evaluation per prospective student-athlete per institution shall be permitted (applied separately to the time period in which a prospective student-athlete completes high school or preparatory school eligibility and to the time period after the prospective student-athlete enrolls full time in a collegiate institution);

(g) Before participating in an on-campus evaluation, a prospective student-athlete is required to undergo a medical examination or evaluation administered or supervised by a physician (e.g., family physician, team physician). The examination or evaluation shall include a sickle cell solubility test unless documented results of a prior test are provided to the institution or the prospective student-athlete declines the test and signs a written release. The examination or evaluation must be administered either within six months before participation in the on-campus evaluation or within six months before the prospective student-athlete’s initial participation in practice, competition or out-of-season conditioning activities during his or her immediately completed season. In addition, the medical examination or evaluation may be conducted by an institution’s regular team physician or other designated physician as a part of the on-campus evaluation;

(h) The institution’s basketball student-athletes may participate in an on-campus evaluation, provided such participation is counted toward the applicable hourly and weekly limitations on countable athletically related activities (e.g., four hours per day and 20 hours per week during the playing season, two hours of skill instruction and eight hours per week outside the playing season). [See Bylaws 17.1.6.2-(a) and 17.1.6.2.2];

(i) The duration of the on-campus evaluation activities (other than the medical examination or evaluation) shall be limited to two hours; and

(j) The institution may provide equipment and clothing to a prospective student-athlete on an issuance-and-retrieval basis.

 

This legislation has an immediate effective date.

Daily Compliance Item- 2/5/13- 13.7.2.5, 13.10.6- Introduction of Prospects

The Ocean State University (OSU) Chemistry Department is hosting a group of prospects today that finished first at a regional science fair.  OSU has provided the prospects with complimentary admissions to tonight’s women’s basketball game and would like to introduce them prior to the start of the game.

Is this permissible?

 

Yes as long as the prospects are only identified as a group.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 1/31/13-Staff Interpretation-Introduction of Prospective Student-Athletes at an Athletics Contest (I)- states that a member institution is permitted to introduce a group that includes prospective student-athletes at an intercollegiate athletics contest, provided the group is visiting campus on a basis unrelated to recruitment and the prospective student-athletes are introduced by group name only.

 

[References: NCAA Bylaws 13.10.6 (introduction of prospective student-athlete); 13.2.1 (general regulation); 13.7.2.5 (visit unrelated to recruitment); and a staff interpretation (01/20/89), Item No. b), which has been archived]

 

This legislation is applicable to Division I and II.

Daily Compliance Item- 2/4/13- 15.5.2.3- Midyear Replacement Participating in Spring Sport

Libero is a volleyball student-athlete at Ocean State University (OSU) who graduated this past December.  Although she has exhausted her eligibility for volleyball, Libero is going to enroll this spring in a graduate program and participate on the women’s golf team.  The volleyball team is currently using all 12 scholarships.  If OSU continues to provide her with athletic aid, can the coach use the mid-year replacement legislation and provide a scholarship to a freshman that just initially enrolled spring 2013?

Yes.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 4/22/11- Midyear Replacement of a Multisport Participant (I)- states that an institution may replace a football or women’s volleyball student-athlete who graduates at midyear or who graduated during the previous academic year (including the summer) with another counter (who, in football; shall count as an initial counter), even if the student-athlete being “replaced” remains enrolled as a graduate student receiving athletically related financial aid and/or participates in another sport.

[References: NCAA Bylaws 15.5.2.3 (midyear replacement – women’s volleyball), 15.5.6.3.5 (midyear replacement) and official interpretation (6/3/98, Item No 1), which has been archived]

Daily Compliance Item- 2/1/13- Current Event

NCAA hammers Southern Miss tennis in major cheating scandal

USATODAY.com

The NCAA may be struggling with its investigation of the Miami case, but it had no problem dropping the hammer on Southern Miss tennis.

The NCAA announced a one-year postseason ban for the men’s tennis program at Southern Miss on Wednesday, in addition to four years of probation, vacating wins between 2008-10 and a seven-year show-cause order for the former head coach.

Seems excessive for a tennis scandal? Actually, as these things go, there was some pretty serious cheating going on at Southern Miss.

The NCAA, according to its public report, found that two former tennis coaches at the school offered a player $5,000 and a car to remain at Southern Miss instead of transferring. The former head coach, Teddy Viator, had also offered $200 to a player to win a match in which he was trailing and organized an illegal foreign tour to the Bahamas in 2008. He was also cited for academic misconduct, arranging for a student-athlete at the school to write a paper for one of his players.

Violator denied in the $5,000 allegation and said the $200 offer was “a joke” in a deposition during the player’s lawsuit against the NCAA to have his eligibility reinstated. That lawsuit was dismissed last year.

Both former coaches declined to be interviewed by the NCAA. The former assistant, who was not named, was charged with unethical conduct for instructing the player to “deny everything.”

According to the report, most of the allegations came from tennis players whose scholarships were not going to be renewed by the head coach. They brought those complaints to Southern Miss compliance in May 2010, at which point the school self-reported violations.

 

This article was selected for educational purposes only