Daily Compliance Item- 12/7/12- Current Event

Tulsa fires athletic director week after he was named in federal gambling investigation

FoxNews.com–AP

TULSA, Okla. –  Tulsa athletic director Ross Parmley was fired Tuesday, a week after he was named in a federal investigation of a man accused of running a gambling operation in Oklahoma City.

Tulsa President Steadman Upham released a letter to students and faculty of the private university Tuesday night, saying Parmley “admitted he had not been truthful” about his role in the mess when he told him in October 2011 that he was cooperating in an FBI investigation.

Parmley was publicly linked last month with the investigation into Teddy Mitchell. In recently unsealed court documents, Parmley is described as an “admitted gambler with Mitchell.”

Mitchell is scheduled for trial in April.

Upham said Parmley told him last year he wasn’t personally involved in the root of the investigation.

“At that time, Ross told me that his involvement was solely due to a family connection to the person being investigated,” Upham said in the letter.

That conversation took place when Parmley was still interim athletic director. He became athletic director in January despite the investigation, which has since drawn the attention of the NCAA.

The university says it is cooperating with the NCAA probe.

A lawyer for Parmley didn’t immediately return a phone message from The Associated Press seeking comment. After Parmley was placed on leave, his attorney, Derek Chance, said Parmley was cooperating with investigators and that he wasn’t a target of the FBI.

Upham says he discussed with Parmley the scope of his involvement in any gambling.

“For obvious reasons, I specifically asked Ross if he had ever gambled on college or professional sports. He told me that friendly wagers during personal golf games constituted the extent of his betting activities. I took Ross at his word, as I had no reason to believe there had been any acts of impropriety or non-compliance,” Upham said.

The 39-year-old Parmley was placed on administrative leave Nov. 27.

“On Tuesday, Nov. 27, while I was out of the country, Ross admitted he had not been truthful in our 2011 conversation,” Parmley said. “He was immediately put on administrative leave and, at my direction, TU notified the NCAA. We subsequently launched our own internal investigation.”

Upham said the school is “cooperating fully with officials from the NCAA to comprehensively investigate this matter and bring it to a fair and proper conclusion. This a difficult time for TU and we realize that our reputation is at stake. We are determined to uncover the whole truth in every aspect of this case.”

Upham noted that he and his wife are on a trip through South America, but pledged to remain in close contact with administrators, university trustees and the NCAA.

Upham served as Tulsa’s president for eight years before retiring June 30 and accepting a teaching position at the university. He retook the helm in October after trustees fired Geoffrey Orsak.

This article was selected for educational purposes only.

Daily Compliance Item- 12/6/12- 17.1.6.2- Out of Season Activities

Ocean State University softball coaches would like to continue with out of season workouts and conditioning up until the beginning of finals week.  Is this permissible?

No.  NCAA Bylaw 17.1.6.2 states that:

(a) Sports Other Than Football. Outside of the playing season, from the institution’s first day of classes of the academic year or September 15, whichever occurs earlier, to one week prior to the beginning of the institution’s final examination period at the conclusion of the academic year, only a student-athlete’s participation in required weight training, conditioning and skill-related instruction shall be permitted.  A student-athlete’s participation in such activities per Bylaw 17.02.1 shall be limited to a maximum of eight hours per week with not more than two hours per week spent on skill-related workouts.  All countable related activities outside the playing season are prohibited one week prior to the beginning of the final examination period for the applicable academic term through the conclusion of each student-athlete’s final exams.  (Revised:  4/27/06 effective 8/1/06, 9/22/06)

(b) Bowl Subdivision Football.  [FBS]  Activities between the institution’s last contest and January 1 are limited to required weight training, conditioning and the review of game film.  A student-athlete’s participation in such activities shall be limited to a maximum of eight hours per week, of which not more than two hours per week may be spent on the viewing of film.  All activities beginning January 1 and outside the playing season shall be conducted pursuant to Bylaw 17.9.6.  (Revised:  12/15/06)

(c) Championship Subdivision Football.  [FCS]  Activities between the institution’s last contest and the start of summer conditioning are limited to required weight training, conditioning and the review of game film.  A student-athlete’s participation in such activities shall be limited to a maximum of eight hours per week, of which not more than two hours per week may be spent on the viewing of film.  All activities beginning with the start of summer conditioning and outside the playing season shall be conducted pursuant to Bylaws 17.9.6.2 and 17.9.6.4.  (Revised:  12/15/06)

 

This legislation is applicable to Division I.

Daily Compliance Item- 12/5/12- Fundraiser for Apparel Items

The Ocean State University Men’s Golf team is required to wear a coat and tie when traveling to away from home competitions.  Several of the student-athletes do not have jackets, so they decide to run a car wash to raise money for the jackets.  Is this permissible?

No.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 11/4/87- Car wash used to earn money to purchase apparel items– states that it would not be permissible per Constitution 3-1-(g)-(5), for student-athletes to conduct a car wash to earn money to purchase apparel items (e.g., travel blazer, jacket) that are not directly related to athletic participation.

Daily Compliance Item- 12/4/12- 13.11.1.2, 13.12.1.1.1- Definition of Men’s Basketball Prospect

The men’s basketball coaches at Ocean State University are very interested in recruiting a few 7th graders they have seen on film.  Is it permissible for the coaches to call them or go visit them in their homes since they have not yet started classes in the 9th grade?

No.  NCAA Educational Column- 11/30/12- Men’s Basketball — Definition of a Prospective Student-Athlete for Tryouts and Camps and Clinics (I)- states that NCAA Division I member institutions should note that, pursuant to NCAA Division I Bylaws 13.11.1.2 and 13.12.1.1.1, for the purposes of tryouts and camps and clinics legislation in men’s basketball, a prospective student-athlete is defined as an individual who has started classes for the seventh grade. This definition is not applicable to other recruiting bylaws (e.g., telephone calls, official visits and contact restrictions).

The following questions and answers are designed to assist member institutions in applying the legislation.

 

Question: Is it permissible for a men’s basketball coach to provide recruiting materials, including general correspondence related to athletics, to seventh or eighth graders or their parents or legal guardians?

Answer: No. The legislation that defines a prospective student-athlete for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation does not change the permissible time period for providing recruiting materials to men’s basketball prospective student-athletes. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.4.1, in men’s basketball, it is not permissible to provide recruiting materials, including general correspondence related to athletics, to an individual or his parents or legal guardians until June 15 at the conclusion of his sophomore year in high school or, for a prospective student-athlete who attends an educational institution that uses a nontraditional calendar (e.g., Southern Hemisphere), the day after the conclusion of the his sophomore year in high school.

 

Question: Is it permissible for a men’s basketball coach to place telephone calls to seventh or eighth graders?

Answer: No. The legislation that defines a prospective student-athlete for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation does not change the permissible time period for placing telephone calls to men’s basketball prospective student-athletes. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.1.3.1.3, it is not permissible for an institutional coaching staff member to make telephone calls to a men’s basketball prospective student-athlete before June 15 of the prospective student-athlete’s sophomore year in high school or, for a prospective student-athlete who attends an educational institution that uses a nontraditional calendar (e.g., Southern Hemisphere), the day after the conclusion of his sophomore year in high school.

 

Question: May a men’s basketball coach make in-person off-campus recruiting contacts with seventh and eighth graders?

Answer: No. The legislation that defines a prospective student-athlete for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation does not change the permissible time period for off-campus contact with men’s basketball prospective student-athletes. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.1.1.1.1, off-campus recruiting contacts may not be made with a men’s basketball prospective student-athlete or his relatives or legal guardians before the opening day of classes for the prospective student-athlete’s junior year in high school.

 

Question: May a seventh or eighth grader be provided an official (paid) visit?

Answer: No. The legislation that defines a prospective student-athlete for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation does not change the date of the first opportunity for men’s basketball prospective student-athletes to receive expense-paid visits. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.6.2.2.1, it is not permissible for a prospective student-athlete to be provided an official visit earlier than January 1 of the prospective student athlete’s junior year of high school.

 

Question: Is it permissible to conduct a boys basketball camp for seventh and eighth graders on an institution’s campus during a dead period?

Answer: No. An institutional sports camp or clinic is defined as camp or clinic that is owned or operated by a member institution, or an employee of the athletics department, and in which prospective student-athletes participate. Seventh and eighth graders are considered prospective student-athletes for purposes of the tryout and camps and clinics legislation; therefore, pursuant to Bylaw 13.12.1.3, institutional boys basketball camps and clinics for seventh and eighth graders may not be conducted during a dead period.

 

Question: May an institution conduct a boys basketball camp or clinic for seventh or eighth graders during the months of June, July or August?

Answer: Yes. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.12.1.1.4, an institution may only conduct an institutional boys basketball camp during the months of June, July or August.

 

Question: May an institution’s men’s basketball coach or noncoaching staff member with basketball-specific duties be employed at another institution’s or noninstitutional boys basketball camp or clinic that includes seventh and eighth graders?

Answer: No. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.12.2.3.2, an institution’s coaching staff member or noncoaching staff member with basketball-specific duties (other than a manager) may only be employed at his or her institution’s camps or clinics.

 

Question: May a basketball coaching staff member attend noninstitutional basketball events, such as camps, leagues, tournaments in which seventh or eighth graders participate during the April or summer evaluation periods?

Answer: Unless the event is certified per Bylaw 13.18, no, it is not permissible for a coach to attend noninstitutional basketball events that include seventh and eighth graders during the April or summer evaluation periods.

 

[References: Division I Bylaws 13.1.1.1 (time period for off-campus contacts — general rule), 13.1.3.1.3 (exception — men’s basketball), 13.1.7.8. (basketball evaluations), 13.4.1 (recruiting materials), 13.6.2.2.1 (first opportunity to visit), 13.11.1.2 (definition of “prospective student-athlete” for tryout purposes – men’s basketball), 13.12.1.1.1 (definition of prospective student-athlete – men’s basketball), 13.12.1.1.4 (basketball), 13.12.1.5 (recruiting calendar exceptions), 13.12.1.7.1 (general rule), 13.12.2.3.2 (institutional/noninstitutional privately owned camps/clinic — basketball) and 13.18 (summer basketball event certification — men’s basketball); an official interpretation (7/13/05, Item No. 1); and a staff interpretation (4/6/94, Item No. a)]

 

This legislation is applicable to Division I.

Daily Compliance Item- 12/3/12- 13.1.5.9- Reviewing Film with a Prospect

Wish Bone is a senior in high school and has been recruited by Ocean State University (OSU) to play football next year.  Wish lives in the locale of the campus and would like to attend a few of OSU’s practices next week as they begin preparations for its upcoming bowl game.  Wish is eager to learn OSU’s offensive system, so he contacted one of the coaches and asked if he could review film with him after one of the practices.

Is it permissible for the coach to review film with Wish?

No.  NCAA Bylaw 13.1.5.9 states that a coaching staff member shall not engage in any practice activities (e.g., review of playbook, chalk talk, film review) with a prospective student-athlete.  A prospective student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent or a written offer of admission or financial aid, or has submitted a financial deposit to the institution in response to the institution’s offer of admission shall not observe an institution’s off-field or off-court practice session (e.g., meeting, film review) that is closed to the general public.  A prospective student-athlete may observe an institution’s on-field or on-court practice session (including a session that is closed to the general public), regardless of whether he or she has signed a National Letter of Intent or a written offer of admission or financial aid, or has submitted a financial deposit to the institution in response to the institution’s offer of admission.