Daily Compliance Item- 8/22/12- 15.3.4.1- Increase in Athletic Aid

Flick Pass is a soccer student-athlete at Ocean State University.  Flick was awarded a 50% athletic scholarship for the 2012-13 academic year.  Flick really impressed the coaches during the pre-season period and earned a spot in the starting line up for the first regular season contest.  On the first day of classes, the Head Coach rewarded Flick’s hard work by increasing her athletic aid to 75%.
Is this permissible?
Yes.  NCAA Bylaw 15.3.4.1 states that institutional financial aid may be increased for any reason at any time.
With the adoption of NCAA Proposal 2011-97, the restrictions associated with increasing athletic aid after the period of the award began were removed. 

Daily Compliance Item- 8/21/12- 17.1.6.3.5, 17.1.6.4.3- Pre-Season Practice

Which of the following is true with regard to countable athletically related activities (CARA) for those sports that are permitted to conduct pre-season practice prior to the start of the academic year?
A.  Daily hour limitations do not apply to CARA prior to the first day of classes or first contest (whichever is earlier).
B.  Weekly hour limitations do not apply to CARA prior to the first day of classes or first contest (whichever is earlier).
C.  Institution is not required to provide a day off to student-athletes prior to the first day of classes or first contest (whichever is earlier).
D.  All of the Above.
The answer is D.  NCAA Bylaw 17.1.6.3.5 states that daily and weekly hour limitations do not apply to countable athletically related activities occurring during preseason practice prior to the first day of classes or the first scheduled contest, whichever is earlier.
NCAA Bylaw 17.1.6.4.3 states that an institution is not required to provide student-athletes with one day off per week during preseason practice that occurs prior to the first day of classes, or the first scheduled contest, whichever is earlier.

Daily Compliance Item- 8/20/12- 13.6.7.5, 13.7.2.1.8- Student Hosts

Ocean State Football coaches have several student managers that work with the team on the field and student workers that work with the staff in the office.  The job responsibilities for these students do not include interaction with prospective student-athletes.
Because they are student workers within the football program, would they be permitted to serve as student hosts when football recruits visit campus?
No.  NCAA Educational Column- 8/17/12-Issues Related to Campus Recruiting Visits (I)-states that the following information is intended to assist member institutions with the application of legislation governing campus recruiting visits.
Hosting Duties.
Institutions should note that pursuant to NCAA Bylaws 13.6.7.5 and 13.7.2.1.8, a student host involved in an official or unofficial visit must be either a current student-athlete or a student designated in a manner consistent with the institution’s policy for providing campus visits or tours to prospective students in general. In this regard, individuals are considered hosts if they are involved in traditional hosting duties, such as tasks that require specific interaction with the prospective student-athlete (e.g., entertaining, escorting). Individuals who are involved solely in administrative functions (e.g., stuffing envelopes, collecting unofficial visit money, handling complimentary admissions) are not considered student hosts.
Further, for purposes of this legislation, student managers and other student employees are considered to be students, as opposed to athletics department employees. Therefore, those individuals are restricted to engaging in general employment functions and are not permitted to host prospective student-athletes unless they meet the criteria noted in the aforementioned bylaws. Finally, inasmuch as student-hosting duties are considered incidental to athletics participation, and an individual must be either a student-athlete or a member of the official university host group, a student-athlete may not be paid to perform this function unless the university typically pays its official host groups for their services.
Athletics Department Involvement with Institutional Hosting Groups.
Pursuant to Bylaws 13.6.7.5 and 13.7.2.1.8, a student host involved in an official or unofficial visit must be either a current student-athlete or a student designated in a manner consistent with the institution’s policy for providing campus visits or tours to prospective students in general. Consistent with this legislation, athletics departments are expected to remain completely uninvolved in the management and operation of these programs. Athletics departments may, however, contribute funds to the overall university host program, provided such funding does not result in the athletics departments assuming control or compromising university oversight of such programs. Further, if permitted by institutional policy, athletics departments may request specific hosts from the institution’s pool of hosts only if such opportunities are available to other institutional departments and the athletics department does not compromise the university’s control or oversight of the host program.
Transportation Costs/Meals and Lodging While in Transit for Parents or Legal Guardians — Men’s Basketball.
Pursuant to Bylaw 13.5.2.6.1, in men’s basketball, an institution may pay the actual round-trip costs for a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians (expenses for up to two people) to accompany the prospective student-athlete on his official visit. In addition, per Bylaw 13.6.7.1.1, in men’s basketball, an institution may pay the actual costs for meals and lodging for a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians (expenses for up to two people) that are incurred while traveling to and from campus to accompany the prospective student-athlete on his official visit.
Standard Lodging.
Pursuant to Bylaw 13.6.6, a prospective student-athlete on an official visit shall be provided lodging and take meals as regular students normally do. Local commercial facilities may be used but at a scale comparable to that of normal student life and only within a 30-mile radius of the institution’s campus. Lodging may not include special accessories (e.g., Jacuzzis, suites) that are not available generally to all guests residing at the establishment. Consistent with the overarching theme that prospective student-athletes should be housed in a similar manner as other prospective students generally, institutions should adhere to the following guidelines: hotels selected to house prospective student-athletes should be similar to hotels in which prospective students are housed, hotels in which visiting teams are housed or lodging used by the institution for away from home contests.
Standard Meals.
Pursuant to Bylaw 13.6.6, a prospective student-athlete on an official visit shall be provided lodging and take meals as regular students normally do. Pursuant to Bylaw 13.6.7.7, meals must be comparable to those provided to student-athletes during the academic year. In this regard, meals provided during an official visit will be considered standard if they are similar in nature to campus meals, including training table meals. Additionally, institutions should note that the training table meal standard is considered the upper limit for all sports, regardless of whether training table is typically provided in a particular sport. Further, pursuant to Bylaw 13.6.7.1, a member institution may not arrange or permit excessive entertainment of a prospective student-athlete on campus or elsewhere. This restriction includes special arrangements for admittance to exclusive or elite restaurants where such opportunities are not generally available to the public.
Standard Transportation.
Pursuant to Bylaw 13.5.2.2.4, an institution transporting a prospective student-athlete (and those accompanying a prospective student-athlete) around campus during the official visit must use institutional vehicles normally used to transport prospective students while visiting the campus. In addition, coaching staff members or student hosts may use personal vehicles to transport a prospective student-athlete (and those accompanying the prospective student-athlete) around campus during an official visit. As a general principle, institutions should note that vehicles used for transportation around campus should be consistent with the type of vehicle an institution uses (or would use) for regular prospective students under similar circumstances, regardless of whether the institution actually provides such transportation. Also, a coaching staff member may use his or her personal vehicle for such purposes, provided the vehicle is used on a regular basis by the coach and has not been modified for the purpose of transporting prospective student-athletes. Further, coaches may rent vehicles for transportation purposes as needed, pursuant to institutional policy, provided those vehicles are considered basic transportation and not modified in any manner for this purpose. Finally, unmodified golf carts and similar vehicles are considered basic transportation; therefore, such vehicles may be used to transport prospective student-athletes around the campus.
[References: NCAA Bylaws 13.5.2.2.4 (on-campus transportation), 13.5.2.6.1 (exception — transportation expenses for a prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians – men’s basketball), 13.6.6 (accommodations on official visit), 13.6.7.1 (general restrictions), 13.6.7.1.1 (meals and lodging while in transit), 13.6.7.5 (student host), 13.6.7.7 (meals on official visit), 13.7.2.1.8 (student host) and staff interpretations (7/26/12, Item Ref. a and b)]

Daily Compliance Item- 8/17/12- Current Event

Roy Williams admits ‘serious mistakes’ were made at UNC

 

USAToday.com

 

The academic scandal at North Carolina, which already has led to the football team getting a bowl ban this season and to an internal investigation about the validity of numerous classes in one department, has grown in scope and size in the last week.

 

The accidental unveiling on the school’s website of the transcript of former football — and basketball — player Julius Peppers has brought questions about the eligibility of athletes beyond football and whether the questionable courses in the department of African and Afro-American Studies dates back further than the four years covered by the school’s investigation. Peppers was at UNC from 1998-2001.

 

Basketball coach Roy Williams, in an appearance Thursday on a Charlotte radio station, was asked about the scandal.

 

After saying he didn’t really want to give his opinion, the man who has coached his alma mater to two NCAA titles since becoming head coach in 2003, expounded and expanded on that:

“You know, I’m bothered by a lot of stuff. I’m bothered by some sensationalism that’s going on. I’m bothered by problems that we have. I’m bothered by mistakes that we have made. But you know, I think in my own opinion it’s best for me to keep my mouth shut and let our administrative people take care of it. …

“And I do think, I have some very strong opinions and yet as soon as I make some strong opinions or anything, then everybody decides to take their bow and arrow and a shotgun and a machine gun and the bazooka and everything out. But for me, I’m going to wait and see what happens at the end, and let those people that are supposed to be taking care of it, take care of it.

But it’s not something that I’m enjoying, I can tell you that.”

He went on to defend his teams’ academic track record at Kansas and UNC, pointing out the accomplishments of center Tyler Zeller, the 2012 Academic All-American of the year in men’s basketball.

But he did admit that there are still problems.

I don’t think you can put your head in the sand and say, oh, we’re all right – it’s just people making things up. I’m not saying that. There’s been some mistakes made, and there’s been some serious mistakes. But I do think that some of it has been a little sensationalized, also.”

Daily Compliance Item- 8/16/12- 14.2.3.1- Basketball Foreign Tour Participation Prior to Initial Enrollment

Back Court is an incoming freshman basketball student-athlete at Ocean State University.  The women’s basketball team will be participating in a foreign tour in France this week prior to the start of the 2012-13 academic year.  If Back participates in competitions on the foreign tour but does not compete in any games during the academic year, does she utilize a season of competition?

 

No.  NCAA Staff Interpretation- 1/28/11- Use of a Season of Competition for Participation in Summer Foreign Tour Prior to Initial Enrollment — Basketball (I)– states that in basketball, an incoming student-athlete (freshman or transfer) who participates on a foreign tour that occurs during the summer prior to his or her initial full-time enrollment at the certifying institution is not charged with a season of competition for such participation.

[References: NCAA Bylaws 14.2.3.1 (minimum amount of competition), 14.2.3.6 (foreign-tour competition) and 17.29.1.4.1.1 (exception — basketball)].

Daily Compliance Item- 8/15/12- 13.8.1.1- Non-Athletics Personnel

The number of in-state students at Ocean State University (OSU) has been on the decline the last couple of years, so the University wants to work more closely with local high schools to help increase in-state enrollment.  As part of this initiative, the Admissions Office is going to invite all of the high school guidance counselors in the area to a home football game this fall.  At the game, the guidance counselors will receive admission to the game, refreshments and an OSU t-shirt.

 

Is this permissible?

 

Yes with conditions.  NCAA Bylaw 13.8.1.1 states that an institutional department outside the athletics department (e.g., president’s office, admissions) may host non-athletics high school, preparatory school or two-year college personnel (e.g., guidance counselors, principals) in conjunction with a home intercollegiate athletics event and may provide such individuals reasonable expenses (e.g., food, refreshments, parking, room) and a nominal gift, provided the visit is not related to athletics recruiting and there is no involvement by the institution’s athletics recruiting and there is no involvement by the institution’s athletics department in the arrangements for the visit, other than providing (in accordance with established policy) free admissions to an athletics event. [R] (Adopted: 3/8/12)

Daily Compliance Item- 8/14/12- 14.4.3.1.6.1- Football- Regaining Eligibility

Laces Out is a junior football student-athlete that transferred to Ocean State University (OSU) in January of 2012.  Laces earned 6 hours during the fall 2011 semester at his previous institution and a total of 27 hours at the conclusion of the 2012 summer term at OSU.
Academic Summary:
*Laces did not complete 9 hours during the fall term at previous institution– not eligible to compete in the first four games during the next season (fall 2012) per Bylaw 14.4.3.1.6.
*Laces earned 27 hours prior to the start of the fall 2012 semester (fall 2011- 6 hours- previous institution; spring 2012- 15 hours- OSU; summer 2012- 6 hours- OSU).  For purposes of this example, all hours earned are acceptable toward any degree program at the respective institutions and Laces met all other NCAA/OSU PTD requirements.
*Laces regains eligibility for the third and fourth football contest during the 2012 season per Bylaw 14.4.3.1.6.1.
*Laces must serve a transfer year in residence at OSU from January 2012 to December 2013.
Because Laces is not eligible to compete during the 2012 season, does the 2 game penalty apply to the 2012 season or is it delayed until the 2013 season?
The penalty is applied to the next season (fall 2012) regardless of whether Laces was eligible to compete. NCAA Staff Interpretation- 4/5/12-Football Additional Credit Hour Requirements — Application of the Two- or Four-Game Penalty to the Following Playing Season (I)- states that, in football, the two- or four-game penalty for failure to successfully complete at least nine-semester hours or eight-quarter hours of academic credit during the fall term and earn the Academic Progress Rate (APR) eligibility point for the fall term applies to the immediately ensuing playing season. Further, that the penalty is satisfied if the student-athlete does not compete in that season, regardless of whether the student-athlete is eligible for competition (e.g., fulfilling a transfer residence requirement, enrolled less than full-time, etc.).
[References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 14.4.3.1 (fulfillment of credit-hour requirements), 14.4.3.1.6 (additional requirements — football), 14.4.3.1.6.1 (regaining eligibility for two contests), 14.4.3.1.6.2 (regaining full eligibility — one-time exception), and staff interpretations (1/20/12, Item No. a), (2/16/12, Item No. a) and (2/16/12, Item No. b)]